Can't Help Singing (1944)

Passed   |    |  Musical, Western


Can't Help Singing (1944) Poster

A senator's daughter (who can't help singing) follows her boyfriend West in the days of the California gold rush.


6.3/10
498

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


31 March 2008 | adamshl
6
| A Three-Song Film
This Durbin vehicle had just three songs worthy of Jerome Kern and E. Y. Harburg: "More and More," "Californ-i-ay," and the title song. These are really wonderful pieces, which fortunately recur throughout on a regular basis.

The Technicolor is indeed glorious, and there's nothing wrong with the casting. It's also true that Durbin looks radiant in her first color film.

Alas, the rest of the score is a disappointment, simply lacking in inspiration. They try to beef it up with production values, to little avail. Likewise, the script's just not quite up to Deanna's standards. One can admire the costumes, staging, photography--and those three songs. Durbin fans will be probably be pleased with everything here; others, probably less so.

It's easy to see the Durbin magic as she lights up the screen with charisma and her beautiful voice. A pleasant trifle for the Durbin DVD "Sweetheart Pack."

Critic Reviews


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Did You Know?

Trivia

This movie is Deanna Durbin's only Technicolor vehicle. Unfulfilled plans to showcase Miss Durbin in color, proposed between 1938 and 1953, included these eventually produced films: First Love (1939) (which starred Miss Durbin in black and white), Phantom of the Opera (1943) (Susanna Foster in Technicolor), Up in Central Park (1948) (Miss Durbin in black and white), A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1948) (Rhonda Fleming in Technicolor), Melba (1953) (Patrice Munsel in Technicolor), Kiss Me Kate (1953) (Kathryn Grayson in Anscocolor), The Student Prince (1954) (Ann Blyth in Anscocolor) and Song of Norway (1970) (Florence Henderson in Color by DeLuxe). As reported by A.H. Weiler in The New York Times on August 3, 1947, Deanna Durbin was being offered a black-and-white filming in Britain of The Beggar's Opera (1953), which ultimately featured Dorothy Tutin portraying Polly Peachum in Technicolor.


Quotes

Lawlor: There is no misunderstanding, your daughter is a liar.
Senator Martin Frost: It's not her fault. She comes from a long line of liars. I am a politician. My father was a politician, and...


Goofs

After her bath Caroline changes into a clean white dress. However, she has had no access to her trunk where she would have kept her clothing. Such a voluminous dress couldn't have been stored in her hat-box or her small case, her only other luggage.


Soundtracks

ELBOW ROOM
Music by
Jerome Kern
Lyrics by E.Y. Harburg
Sung by chorus of wagon train folks

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Musical | Western

Details

Release Date:

29 December 1944

Language

English, Russian


Country of Origin

USA

Filming Locations

Duck Creek, Kanab, Utah, USA

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