Double Indemnity (1944)

Passed   |    |  Crime, Drama, Film-Noir


Double Indemnity (1944) Poster

An insurance representative lets himself be talked into a murder/insurance fraud scheme that arouses the suspicion of an insurance investigator.

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8.3/10
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  • Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray in Double Indemnity (1944)
  • Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray in Double Indemnity (1944)
  • "Double Indemnity" Fred MacMurray 1944 Paramount / MPTV
  • "Double Indemnity" Fred MacMurray, Edward G. Robinson 1944 Paramount / MPTV
  • Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray in Double Indemnity (1944)
  • Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray in Double Indemnity (1944)

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23 December 2005 | ccthemovieman-1
10
| Justifiably At The Top Of Most Film Noir Lists
This is one of the best-liked classic films of all time and I am among that large group of fans as well.

Few movies have ever had dialog this entertaining.....at least the conversations between Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray. I think it's a big appeal to this movie, except to younger folks who look at it as "cheesy."

I read the book, Double Indemnity written by James Cain, and was surprised that the film's snappy dialog was not in it. This is one of the rare times when the movie was far better than the book. That's not a shock after you find out that literary giant Raymond Chandler and Hall Of Fame director Billy Wilder combined to write the screenplay,

For a murder/suspense story, there is very little action, almost none, yet there are no boring lulls. The three main actors - Stanwyck, MacMurray and Edward G. Robinson, are what make this so good.

MacMurray's narration is fun to hear as he tells the story in flashback, from the beginning by dictating into an old Dictaphone to his co-worker Robinson. The latter is almost mesmerizing in his performance, the way he delivers his lines. He can even make a speech about something as boring as insurance and still keep you riveted to the screen.

Stanwyck was no sex symbol (at least to me) but she looked great here in the most seductive of 1940s clothing and, like Robinson, has a distinctive voice and accent that keeps your attention.

This film was the inspiration for the 1980 movie, "Body Heat," starring William Hurt and Kathleen Turner. That, too, was a very, very good movie....but not many films are in the class of this one.

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