Jane Eyre (1943)

Approved   |    |  Drama, Romance


Jane Eyre (1943) Poster

After a harsh childhood, orphan Jane Eyre is hired by Edward Rochester, the brooding lord of a mysterious manor house, to care for his young daughter.


7.5/10
7,425

Videos


Photos

  • Peggy Ann Garner in Jane Eyre (1943)
  • "Jane Eyre" Elizabeth Taylor, Peggy Ann Garner 1944 20th Century Fox MPTV
  • Joan Fontaine and Orson Welles in Jane Eyre (1943)
  • "Jane Eyre" Elizabeth Taylor, Peggy Ann Garner 1944 20th Century Fox MPTV
  • Elizabeth Taylor during filming of "Jane Eyre" 20th Cent. Fox
  • Orson Welles and John Abbott in Jane Eyre (1943)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


16 February 2002 | Spleen
8
| Excellent shadows
Stevenson isn't willing to let us forget that his film is based on a book. The first thing we see a leather-bound volume with the title "Jane Eyre" emblazoned on the cover; the book opens to reveal the film's credits exquisitely lettered on the opening pages. We're in danger of falling in love with the book as an object before the story even begins. By the time Joan Fontaine had finished reading out Brönte's opening paragraph, with the sentences themselves before me, I was in no mood to watch the movie - I wanted to go away and read the book.

Yet when it's not reminding us that it's at heart a version of something else, it's a very good film, falling not too far short of David Lean's "Oliver Twist" - which it resembles. Both films were shot almost entirely in the studio, yet don't feel studio-bound; they feel rather as though the directors had managed to find unusually claustrophobic out-of-door (or, in Lean's case, urban) locations. In both films a portion of every frame is consumed by impenetrable shadow. (Yet "Eyre" is detailed, and makes the best possible use of every frame.) Both films take place around in a callous England of the 1920s. (I got the impression that if Brönte's characters had for some reason gone to London they would have encountered Dickens's, although this impression was destroyed when the rich Londoners visit Rochester's castle.) Both films manage to be sentimental in an agreeable way. Both have excellent musical scores. In fact, this may be Herrmann's best score of the 1940s, certainly better than the one he wrote for "Citizen Kane", which is seems better than it is because the film as a whole is a masterpiece.

If you can, make sure you see a print with a pristine soundtrack. Orson Welles isn't always easy to understand.

Critic Reviews



Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com