Blue Skies (1946)

Approved   |    |  Comedy, Musical, Romance


Blue Skies (1946) Poster

Jed Potter looks back on a love triangle conducted over the course of years and between musical numbers. Dancer Jed loves showgirl Mary, who loves compulsive nightclub-opener Johnny, who ... See full summary »


6.5/10
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  • Fred Astaire and Bing Crosby in Blue Skies (1946)
  • Billy De Wolfe in Blue Skies (1946)
  • Karolyn Grimes in Blue Skies (1946)
  • Fred Astaire does a climatic jump during his "Puttin' on the Ritz" number for the 1946 movie "Blue Skies."
  • Olga San Juan in Blue Skies (1946)
  • Will Wright in Blue Skies (1946)

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28 June 2004 | bkoganbing
8
| Following the trend of Crosby leading ladies.
For the second and last collaboration of Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, and Irving Berlin, Bing and Fred needed all of their collective charm and talent to make this one work.

Bing and Fred play the same type roles in this as in Holiday Inn. Fred's the ambitious partner of an act who wants to get to the top of the show business ladder. Bing just wants to work at the trade and go through life with the least responsibility possible. Of course they fall for the same girl as in Holiday Inn and at Paramount in the 1940s who do you think winds up with the girl?

But the real star of this film is the music of Irving Berlin. This time Paramount gave Crosby and Astaire technicolor and it's put to good use with some great numbers. Astaire does two classic dance numbers with Putting on the Ritz and Heat Wave. Crosby gets two big budget numbers with Everybody Step and C-U-B-A, the latter nicely paired with Olga San Juan.

Previous reviewers found Joan Caulfield as the object of affections performance weak. Maybe so, but she's following a trend of Crosby leading ladies who are nice girls swept up by the Crosby song and charm. It wasn't until Jane Wyman did those two films with Bing that he got a leading lady with real spirit. Sometimes Bing didn't even get the girl.

The hit song here was You Keep Coming Back Like A Song which was a recurring theme. It got Oscar nominated, but lost to Judy Garland's train excursion On the Atchison, Topeka, and the Santa Fe.

Billy DeWolfe also does a nice comic turn and we get his famous Mrs. Mergitroid act which he did in nightclubs.

Though the plot is thin who cares when you can see Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire at their very best.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Gary Cooper's name was not in the original lyrics for the song "Puttin' on the Ritz." Irving Berlin rewrote the lyrics for 'Puttin' on the Ritz' for this film in 1946, to be about watching rich people on Park Avenue. But when he originally wrote it in 1929, it was about going up to Lennox Avenue in Harlem to watch black people dressed in ill-fitting, gaudy clothes, having a "jubilee." The 1946 lines "Dressed up like a million-dollar trouper, trying hard to look like Gary Cooper, Super dooper," were originally, in 1929, "That's where each and every Lulu Belle goes, every Thursday evening in her swell clothes, rubbin' elbows." Other original lyrics include the reference to Lennox Avenue (a famous main street in Harlem) and such racist lines as, "Spangled gowns upon a bevy of high browns from down the levy, all misfits, puttin' on the Ritz." Recordings exist, on You Tube for instance, of Astaire performing the original lyrics in 1930, and of Harry Richman's performance of the original song in a production number from the 1930 film, Puttin' on the Ritz (1930) .


Quotes

Jed Potter: Song and Dance Man.
Johnny Adams: Song and Dance Man, that's right.
Jed Potter: He didn't remember it then, how could he know it now?
Johnny Adams: Oh, get out, I bet I could do it right now, the whole thing.


Goofs

At the beginning of the movie, which is just after World War I, the Crosby character tells the De Wolfe character to do his Frankenstein routine. The Frankenstein character he does is based on Boris Karloff's 1931 version which some ten years or so in the future. At that time in the movie Frankenstein was just a creature in Mary Shelly's book.


Soundtracks

Everybody Step
Words and Music by
Irving Berlin (1921)
Sung by Bing Crosby
Danced by chorus

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Comedy | Musical | Romance

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