Decoy (1946)

Approved   |    |  Crime, Drama, Film-Noir


Decoy (1946) Poster

A mortally wounded female gangster recounts how she and her gang revived an executed killer from the gas chamber, to try and find out where he buried a fortune in cash.


6.8/10
1,390

Photos

  • Stanley Rubin at an event for Decoy (1946)
  • Jean Gillie in Decoy (1946)
  • Jean Gillie in Decoy (1946)
  • Jean Gillie in Decoy (1946)
  • Robert Armstrong, Jean Gillie, Sheldon Leonard, Edward Norris, and Herbert Rudley in Decoy (1946)
  • Jean Gillie, Sheldon Leonard, and Edward Norris in Decoy (1946)

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User Reviews


22 June 2001 | horn-5
Jean Gillie redefines femme fatale.
And makes Barbara Stanwyck and Ann Savage look like Ned(Jane?)in the first reader in the process. And, in "Decoy", femme fatality is a more apt term as all the male characters she encounters have less chance of surviving than Elisha Cook Jr. did going against Jack Palance in "Shane"...zip,nada,none,nought,zap and gone. Sheldon Leonard survives an encounter but only because she is dying when he shows up. The surprise is that she didn't take him out on the way out. Repeated viewings still figure him for no better than even at that. The taglines and blurbs on the posters and ads paint the following picture of her Margot Shelby character: "SHE TREATS MEN THE WAY THEY'VE BEEN TREATING WOMEN FOR YEARS!" Another line defines that as; "She Two-Times, Steals, Cheats, Double-Crosses...Anything To Get What She Wants...and then KISSES THEM OFF." Actually, she runs a car over Edward Norris, which was lack of good judgement on his part for hanging around with a broad known for..."kissing quick and killing quicker." She takes doctor Herbert Rudley away from Marjorie Woodworth,as she needs him to revive her just-executed in the gas chamber boy friend---no lack of plot in this one---which accounts for the only credibility gap in the film...somebody please tell me why Marjorie Woodworth wanted Herbert Rudley in the first place. Good riddance,Marjorie, you can do better although, come to think of it, you seldom did. Gillie gives Rudley a shovel, makes him dig up the buried money and then, in payment for past favors and services, shoots him dead. She had to double check to make certain as there wasn't much difference in his performance either way. Bottom line: Jean Gillie gets a wing to herself in the Femme Fatale Hall of Fame.

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