It's a Wonderful Life (1946)

PG   |    |  Drama, Family, Fantasy


It's a Wonderful Life (1946) Poster

An angel is sent from Heaven to help a desperately frustrated businessman by showing him what life would have been like if he had never existed.


8.6/10
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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


4 March 1999 | Coxer99
10
| A Great Influence...
No movie ever made has influenced me more than this classic. I had the honor of doing a play version of it about 5 years ago. I had seen the film thousands of times, had loved it, but I never really knew what it meant. During the course of the production, I suddenly felt alive. I felt that I wasn't having enough fun. I felt that I wasn't doing enough in my life. Crazy things, like kissing my mother or my father. I hadn't really hugged one of them in a while. It makes you think. It's more of a thinking person's film than a mere Christmas film. If you think it's just a Christmas film, I insist you watch it again and again, until you get the message.

Stewart gives the finest performance of his career, in one of the most difficult characters ever portrayed. A character all of us are familiar with...a person looking to find himself/herself. It's the great struggle for finding what it is in life you really want to do. George Bailey teaches us so lessons throughout the film and in the end he teaches us the most important lesson of all, that life, although a long and winding road, truly is (for lack of a better word) wonderful...

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Did You Know?

Trivia

A photograph of James Stewart at the age of six months, donated by his parents, was included in the Bailey home set.


Quotes

Mr. Emil Gower: I owe everything to George Bailey. Help him, dear Father.
Giuseppe Martini: Joseph, Jesus and Mary. Help my friend, Mr. Bailey.
Ma Bailey: Help my son, George, tonight.
Bert: He never thinks about himself, God, that's why he's in trouble.
Ernie Bishop: George is a good guy. Give him a break, God.
Mary: I ...
Janie Bailey: ...


Goofs

Harry Bailey is not "shown jumping from a plane with other paratroopers". He is shown in the Ready Room of his aircraft carrier, (the walls and door of which are decidedly not shaped like the interior of a troop transport airplane) going through the exit to the flight deck to his fighter plane. He and the other fighter pilots wear padded cloth aircrew helmets with radio headphones and goggles, not "steel pots" like paratroopers would, and there is no overhead static jump line at the doorway to which paratroopers' parachutes would be hooked up to.


Crazy Credits

A ringing facsimile of the Liberty Bell (without the crack) forms the backdrop for the studio logo, which is Liberty Films, and the opening credits are in a scrapbook with Christmas decorations. The bell reappears before the end credits, and the end credits have a Christmas card picture as a backdrop.


Alternate Versions

The film was colorized three times. The first colorized version of the film was produced by Hal Roach Studios (now Sonar Entertainment), the second by Republic Pictures. A third colorization of the film was produced by Legend Films for Paramount, the film's current copyright holder, in 2007.


Soundtracks

Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star
(uncredited)
Traditional Song

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Drama | Family | Fantasy

Details

Release Date:

7 January 1947

Language

English, French


Country of Origin

USA

Filming Locations

California, USA

Box Office

Budget:

$3,180,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$44,000 20 December 2020

Gross USA:

$44,000

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$6,184,298

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