Gentleman's Agreement (1947)

Not Rated   |    |  Drama, Romance


Gentleman's Agreement (1947) Poster

A reporter pretends to be Jewish in order to cover a story on anti-Semitism, and personally discovers the true depths of bigotry and hatred.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

7.4/10
13,029

Photos

  • Gregory Peck and Anne Revere in Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
  • Gregory Peck and Dean Stockwell in Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
  • Dorothy McGuire in Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
  • Celeste Holm in Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
  • Gregory Peck in Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
  • Dorothy McGuire in Gentleman's Agreement (1947)

See all photos

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


22 June 2006 | Incalculacable
7
| Groundbreaking
I hate to say it, but before I saw this movie, I did not realize that there was racism against Jews in the post war period. I couldn't understand it: why would Americans promote the very thing they fought against in the war? Then I was informed that they weren't fighting against racism or discrimination, but against the Nazi regime and genocide. There is a large difference between one person's opinion and a government policy. I'm a teenager, and the fact that Jews were still discriminated against was never mentioned to me. Maybe it should be better known. I am doing Modern History next year and we will be studying the Second World War, and I'm very glad I saw this film (despite its inaccuracies).

Anyway – now to the plot. Phillip Green (Gregory Peck) is a writer who pretends to be Jewish to find out about anti-Semitism. Through this, he learns how much people discriminate against Jews and it affects him deeply and changes his life.

I was never bored in this film. I am forever fascinated by Peck, who I've always remembered as Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962). This is only the second film I've seen with Peck in his younger days (it's quite a pleasure watching him). Celeste Holm also is amazing and I love how she can laugh so easily – very realistic. The only thing I wasn't satisfied with is the romantic choices by Peck's character. I wish he would have chosen the happy blonde Anne instead of the sappy, boring Kathy. Oh, how I was hoping he would choose Anne! Perhaps Dorothy McGuire was miscast; maybe someone else could have brought more energy to her character. John Garfield is fantastic as Green's Jewish friend.

This was ground breaking at the time and I really respect the people who participated in this film for taking a risk. Despite being made almost 60 years ago, I have not only learned from it but enjoyed it. Yes, there are some inaccuracies and plot holes, but I don't particularly care and it doesn't distract me. It's a great film, go see it.

Critic Reviews



IMDb's "What's on TV": Three New Shows You Can't Miss

Looking for something to watch this week? Our top picks include a true-crime turn from Chris Pine, some amazingly awkward sex therapy, and a new live musical, presented by M&M's.

Watch our video

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to the Academy Awards, see what IMDb editors are watching, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com