Gentleman's Agreement (1947)

Not Rated   |    |  Drama, Romance


Gentleman's Agreement (1947) Poster

A reporter pretends to be Jewish in order to cover a story on anti-Semitism, and personally discovers the true depths of bigotry and hatred.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

7.4/10
13,132

Photos

  • Gregory Peck and Dean Stockwell in Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
  • Gregory Peck in Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
  • Dorothy McGuire in Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
  • Gregory Peck and Anne Revere in Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
  • Celeste Holm in Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
  • Dorothy McGuire in Gentleman's Agreement (1947)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


4 December 1998 | Bryan Ho
Important message, poor execution
Although one certainly cannot say Gentleman's Agreement is not passionate in its aim to uncover the invisible cloak of anti-Semitism in post-war America, the execution of that objective could have used slightly more dramatic tension and immediacy.

Released the same year and touching on the same subject was Edward Dmytryk's Crossfire, which dealt with anti-Semitism at its extremes: murder with anti-Semitism as the motive. Gentleman's Agreement takes a more humanistic and subtle approach--one that is too subtle at times. Where Crossfire dropped the bomb of anti-Semitism into the laps of the audience, Gentleman's Agreement gives it to you in periodic shots in the arm in the form of a sermon, and each one says the exact same thing: anti-Semitism is bad. (But we knew that.) Yes, the message is an important one, but feeding it to the audience in a manner that is literally shoving it down our throats every few minutes doesn't help the digestion any.

Also lacking in Gentleman's Agreement is a three-dimensional protagonist. Peck's crusading writer who masquerades as a Jew is simply too zealous and unswerving for his own good. He has no faults, no inner conflicts and no doubts about himself. Whether he's being shunned by bigots or Dorothy McGuire, he's such a straight-shooter you know what he's going to do before he does: the right thing right away.

There's no real dramatic arc in the story, with the entire weight of the movie resting on the torrid on-again-off-again love affair between Peck and McGuire. She symbolizes the hypocrisy and passiveness of the everyday American on anti-Semitism, and he points it out to her every chance he gets-and that's all. It pretty much rambles on the same dramatic level all throughout the picture, dividing its time between love scenes and sermons, most of which are indistinguishable from one another.

In the end, the important message and the overall entertainment value of the picture suffers from this redundancy.

Critic Reviews



More Like This

  • Going My Way

    Going My Way

  • All the King's Men

    All the King's Men

  • Mrs. Miniver

    Mrs. Miniver

  • The Life of Emile Zola

    The Life of Emile Zola

  • Hamlet

    Hamlet

  • Marty

    Marty

  • Grand Hotel

    Grand Hotel

  • Cavalcade

    Cavalcade

  • You Can't Take It with You

    You Can't Take It with You

  • The Great Ziegfeld

    The Great Ziegfeld

  • Mutiny on the Bounty

    Mutiny on the Bounty

  • The Lost Weekend

    The Lost Weekend

Did You Know?

Trivia

Many were concerned that this film would somehow lend credence to the bizarre belief among the political right that "Jewish-friendly" films and novels from the time were inspired by communism, or were intentionally made as Communist propaganda. That fear was legitimized somewhat when many of the people involved with the film were brought before the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) -- which was tasked with uncovering "Communist subversion" in the entertainment industry -- including Darryl F. Zanuck, Anne Revere, (perhaps most notoriously) Elia Kazan and John Garfield. Garfield was brought before HUAC twice, was blacklisted, taken off the blacklist and put back on it again; it was believed that the stress of these experiences led to the heart attack that killed him at the age of 39.


Quotes

Tommy Green: They called me a dirty Jew and a stinking kike, and they all ran away.
Kathy Lacey: Oh, darling, it's not true. You're no more Jewish than I am. It's just some horrible mistake.
Phil Green: Kathy!


Goofs

When Phil is taking Tommy to meet his (Phil's) mother at Saks Fifth Avenue, they stop in front of the statue of Atlas outside Rockefeller Center. In the shot of the two of them talking, with Fifth Avenue in the background, Saks is directly behind them, diagonally across the street on the right, with St. Patrick's Cathedral on the left. But when Phil looks at his watch and tells Tommy they'd better leave to meet grandma, the two hurry off back north along Fifth Avenue - in the completely opposite direction of the plainly visible Saks.

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Drama | Romance

How Ricky Whittle Brings Shadow Moon to Life

Ricky Whittle, the star at the center of "American Gods," credits amazing co-stars and killer special effects for his mind-bending performance.

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to the SXSW 2019, what to watch on TV, and a look back at the 2018-2019 awards season.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com