Where There's Life (1947)

Approved   |    |  Comedy, Thriller


Where There's Life (1947) Poster

The American son of an Eastern European monarch wounded in an assassination attempt becomes a target for a terrorist organization.


6.8/10
285

Photos

  • William Bendix, Bob Hope, and Signe Hasso in Where There's Life (1947)
  • William Bendix, Bob Hope, and Vera Marshe in Where There's Life (1947)
  • Bob Hope in Where There's Life (1947)
  • Bob Hope and Signe Hasso in Where There's Life (1947)
  • Bob Hope, Anthony Caruso, and Joseph Vitale in Where There's Life (1947)
  • William Bendix and Bob Hope in Where There's Life (1947)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


3 December 2006 | bkoganbing
6
| Barovia Is In a Hopeless Situation
The country of Barovia is in a real pickle. A terrorist organization called The Mordia threatens to take over especially after an assassination attempt on the last king, leaves him critically wounded and clinging to life.

The king's only heir; the product of a youthful indiscretion when he was sowing some wild oats in America and guess who that is. General Signe Hasso in her best imitation of Greta Garbo in Ninotchka is sent to bring Hope back to Barovia.

Hope, who's a radio host in New York and engaged to Vera Marshe, is less than enthusiastic about the job of king, especially with the Mordia trying to kill him. But there's Hasso so the situation does have its compensations.

Where There's Life is an odd man out among Rapid Robert's films of the forties when Hope was at the high point of his career. It only runs for 75 minutes, unusually short for an A film. It's funny in a lot of spots, but not nearly as good as others he was doing at this time like Monsieur Beaucaire or The Paleface.

Where There's Life does have some good supporting players for Hope and Hasso with Dennis Hoey, George Coulouris, and George Zucco as various Barovian nationals. And of course it has the incomparable William Bendix.

Bendix, though a supporting actor at Paramount, was a star on radio with The Life of Riley at this time. He plays a New York City police officer and prospective brother-in-law to Hope. Devoted fans of Chester A. Riley will get to hear him utter his favorite radio catchphrase, 'what a revolting development this is.'

Will Barovia get out of a Hopeless situation?

Critic Reviews


Alan Ruck Discusses the Genius of John Hughes

Alan Ruck draws connections between his breakout role in Ferris Bueller's Day Off and his recent work on the Emmy-nominated "Succession."

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

Join us Sunday, Sept. 22, at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT for IMDb LIVE After the Emmys, with exclusive interviews, and more. Plus, see what IMDb editors are watching this month.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com