A Song Is Born (1948)

Approved   |    |  Comedy, Music, Musical


A Song Is Born (1948) Poster

With her gangster boyfriend under investigation by the police, a nightclub singer hides out in a musical research institution staffed by bachelor professors - one of whom begins to fall for her.


7/10
1,905

Photos

  • Danny Kaye and Virginia Mayo in A Song Is Born (1948)
  • Danny Kaye and Virginia Mayo in A Song Is Born (1948)
  • Danny Kaye and Virginia Mayo in A Song Is Born (1948)
  • Danny Kaye and Mary Field in A Song Is Born (1948)
  • A Song Is Born (1948)
  • Danny Kaye and Virginia Mayo in A Song Is Born (1948)

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Cast & Crew

Top Billed Cast



Director:

Howard Hawks

Writers:

Billy Wilder (based on the story "From A to Z" by), Thomas Monroe (based on the story "From A to Z" by)

Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


8 March 2006 | jimmegb
8
| It's worth watching for the music alone.
While there is a decent plot and Danny Kaye does a good job, the best parts are the music scenes with Benny Goodman, Lionel Hampton, Louis Armstrong, Tommy Dorsey and many others. It is a great collection of popular artists of the 40's and earlier.

There are surprises in the plot, especially if you don't recognize some of the actors until they perform.

Danny Kaye's form of humor is not fully appreciated now, but in his time he drew a large following. This movie is a good example of his artistry. His best movie was probably "Hans Christian Anderson." I watched it as a kid and I can still remember the song "Beautiful, Beautiful Copenhagen."

Critic Reviews



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Did You Know?

Trivia

It is commonly assumed that Danny Kaye had left his wife Sylvia Fine during the filming of this movie in order to take up an affair with Eve Arden. This is incorrect however as Kaye and Arden had already been having an affair since 1941 (one year after Danny and Sylvia were married). Arden had divorced her husband earlier that year assuming that Kaye was going to divorce his wife in order to marry her; however, when he left Sylvia in 1947, he also left Arden and never resumed their affair. Arden later remarried. Kaye was going through a sort of a nervous breakdown during this period after the separation and was seeing a psychiatrist while shooting 'A Song is Born' (literally stopping work almost every day in order to see the psychiatrist) which seemed to have stemmed from a feeling of inadequacy due to the knowledge that his wife's talents were a large part of his success. Kaye needed to learn for himself once and for all whether or not he was talented enough to be a hit on his own, and shortly left for England to begin a long tour which eventually lead him to the London Palladium where he was an absolute smash. He singlehandedly took Britain by storm, and his success made history. Historians have found that Beatle-mania was infantile in its scale when compared to the frenzy Kaye caused in Britain at the Palladium. After realizing what a smash he had become, Kaye finally felt secure in the knowledge that he could indeed be a success on his own; He and Sylvia reconciled and he returned home to his family. In 1948, King George ordered Danny return to the Palladium for a Royal Command Performance and Danny accepted. Since Sylvia had never been to England and Danny wished to make up for all that had happened between them, Kaye asked his wife to return with him. She did.


Quotes

Honey Swanson: Oh, you're cute. Just a little sunlight in my hair and you had to water your neck.


Goofs

Just after "Bubbles" finishes his "Bop-bop-a-rebop" routine the camera switches to another view. It is obviously a second take since his mouth is clearly saying 'rebop', but there is no sound.


Soundtracks

Anvil Chorus from Il Trovatore
(1853) (uncredited)
Music by
Giuseppe Verdi
Played during the long-haired music session

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Comedy | Music | Musical | Romance

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