The Lone Ranger (1949–1957)

TV Series   |  TV-G   |    |  Western


Episode Guide
The Lone Ranger (1949) Poster

The adventures of the masked hero and his Native American partner.

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7.9/10
1,684

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  • The Lone Ranger (1949)
  • Clayton Moore in The Lone Ranger (1949)
  • Clayton Moore and Jay Silverheels in The Lone Ranger (1949)
  • Jay Silverheels in The Lone Ranger (1949)
  • Robert Rockwell and Dorothy Vaughan in The Lone Ranger (1949)
  • Mike Ragan in The Lone Ranger (1949)

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Cast & Crew

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Creators:

George W. Trendle, George W. George

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User Reviews


2 April 2008 | aimless-46
8
| A Classic
The 221 episodes of "The Lone Ranger" were originally broadcast on ABC from 1949 to 1957; and then for many years they played in local syndication. For most of the original broadcast years the series was ABC's most watched piece of programming.

The new DVD set from Pop Flix contains the first 16 episodes (15 Sept-29 Dec 1949) and for some reason unknown to me episode 22 from the fifth season, for a total of 17 episodes (the same 17 available on last year's Mill Creek Entertainment release so these are probably in the public domain). These sets pretty much render "The Legend of the Lone Ranger" movie superfluous as all three episodes that were combined in 1952 to form the movie are included in these releases.

The early episodes hark back to radio as there is considerably more voice-over narration used as an introduction and to introduce key plot moments.

The series itself was pure kiddie western with clear-cut good and evil distinctions and no romance. The title character (played by Clayton Moore) started out Texas Ranger John Reid. The first three episodes provide the background for his transformation to Lone Ranger status, his partnering with the Indian Tonto (Jay Silverheels), and the taming of his horse "Silver".

There is an unambiguous code of positive morality infusing each episode. The Lone Ranger is totally good but he adopts the guise of evil. While a masked man in the west was normally feared by the good citizens and an Indian was distrusted, the Lone Ranger is feared by those who would do evil. One persistent theme is that when the Lone Ranger and Tonto first encounter an average citizen they are greeted with suspicion, and by the end of the episode the citizen has been convinced of their value. The trademark ending was a secondary character asking the question: "who was that masked man?".

To really enjoy the series you must accept it for the simplistic morality tale it was intended to be. If you don't take it seriously and keep wishing for some self-reflexive campy parody elements you will only get frustrated.

Then again, what do I know? I'm only a child.

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