It Happens Every Spring (1949)

Approved   |    |  Comedy, Sci-Fi, Sport


It Happens Every Spring (1949) Poster

A scientist discovers a formula that makes a baseball which is repelled by wood. He promptly sets out to exploit his discovery.


6.8/10
1,468

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  • Ray Milland in It Happens Every Spring (1949)
  • Ray Milland and Paul Douglas in It Happens Every Spring (1949)
  • It Happens Every Spring (1949)
  • Ray Milland, Ed Begley, and Ray Teal in It Happens Every Spring (1949)
  • Ray Milland, Paul Douglas, and Jean Peters in It Happens Every Spring (1949)
  • It Happens Every Spring (1949)

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19 December 2003 | Bruce_Cook
Sports and sci-fi -- together in one film!
In addition to being an enjoyable romantic comedy, this is actually a tidy little sci-fi yarn that foreshadows the 1950s sci-fi craze that began just two years later.

Ray Milland stars as an underpaid college professor who can't marry fiance' Jean Peters because he's so poor. Fame and fortune will be his, however, if he succeeds with his experimental attempts to develop a solution that causes wood to repel termites (what a concept!). But a baseball crashes through his laboratory window and destroys his equipment, botching up the solution during it's final mixing stage. Milland ends up with something very different than what he intended to make: a liquid that repels wood. He soaks a baseball in the solution and discovers that no bat can touch it!

Unfortunately he can't duplicate the accident that created the solution, so he only has one small bottle of it. Milland conceives a bold money-making scheme; he applies for a job as a rookie pitcher with a down-on-their-luck team. Using solution-soaked baseballs that repel bats, Milland throws impossible-to-hit pitches, and soon his low-ranked team becomes serious contenders for the pennant!

The special effects of the baseball hopping and looping over the bat are terrific (and the ball makes the same sound as Gort's ray in "The Day the Earth Stood Still", another 20th Century Fox film that came out two years later).

There's plenty of laughs in this imaginative, well-played little classic. Paul Douglas does a fine job as Milland's roommate and the team's catcher. Directed by Lloyd Bacon from a witty screenplay by Valentine Davies.

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