Red, Hot and Blue (1949)

Approved   |    |  Comedy, Crime, Musical


Red, Hot and Blue (1949) Poster

An aspiring actress finds herself in a jam when a gangster, who is backing the show she is in, is found dead in her apartment.


6.1/10
199

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  • Victor Mature and Betty Hutton in Red, Hot and Blue (1949)
  • Victor Mature and Betty Hutton in Red, Hot and Blue (1949)
  • Victor Mature and Betty Hutton in Red, Hot and Blue (1949)
  • Victor Mature and Betty Hutton in Red, Hot and Blue (1949)
  • Betty Hutton and Wally Westmore in Red, Hot and Blue (1949)
  • "Red, Hot and Blue" Betty Hutton 1949 Paramount

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


17 May 2007 | eschetic
3
| She'll have you thinking of "Murder," she will
If you don't want to kill the late Betty Hutton (at her over-the-top over-energetic worst here) six minutes into the film, you'll probably have a good time with this Frank Loesser vehicle that disappointingly has no relationship at all to the better known and more tuneful Cole Porter stage show with Ethel Merman. There's nothing here to erase memories of Hutton's hit song "Murder He Says" from her best film, 1943's HAPPY GO LUCKY with Mary Martin.

GUYS AND DOLLS it isn't, but it is fun to see Loesser himself (who wrote the semi-score for Hutton to chew scenery through) turn in a credible acting job as a mobster who just might bump off the always irritating Hutton before her screen roommates quite reasonably get the idea. June Havoc (Gypsy Rose Lee's real life sister) is a bit long in the tooth but excellent as the chief imposed-upon roommate, as is an almost young William Frawley as Hutton's eager agent (years before he became "Uncle Charley" on TV's MY THREE SONS) and co-top billed Victor Mature as the director in the central backstage story who is also a rooming house neighbor and inexplicable boyfriend.

There are only so many twists on the familiar backstage film plot, and this RED, HOT AND BLUE bowwows most of the best from more famous films like 42ND STREET, but John Farrow and Charles Lederer's screenplay makes them almost feel fresh as it bounces pin-ball fashion from point to point.

Look for William Talman (later prosecutor Hamilton Burger on TV's PERRY MASON) and Broadway's Jack Kruschen in a couple of effective small roles.

For me, though, the high point of the film was when Percy Helton's stage manager (looking remarkably like the stage's Harold J. Kennedy) gives a perfect assessment of the star's talent following a number imposed upon him outside the stage door. THAT'S entertainment.

Critic Reviews


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Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Comedy | Crime | Musical | Romance

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