The Men (1950)

Passed   |    |  Drama


The Men (1950) Poster

A paralyzed war vet tries to adjust to the world without the use of his limbs.

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7.2/10
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  • Marlon Brando and Teresa Wright in The Men (1950)
  • Marlon Brando and Everett Sloane in The Men (1950)
  • Marlon Brando in The Men (1950)
  • Marlon Brando, Teresa Wright, MEN, THE, United Artists, 1950, **I.V.
  • Marlon Brando in The Men (1950)
  • Marlon Brando in The Men (1950)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


22 March 2002 | jeffhill1
A film with guts
Marlon Brando's first film, "The Men" is conspicuous for many things

including how little he got paid for it, the method acting that went

into it, and the time Brando spent living like a patient in a veteran's

paraplegic hospital. One story I heard was that one night when Brando

was at a public place with the other (real) patients, a Bible thumper

started ranting about the power of faith. Brando gestured the man over

and asked him, "Let me ask you something, mister. If my faith is

strong enough, will I be able to walk again?" The religious ranter

paused and then said, "Yes, son. If it is God's will, you will even

be able to walk again." So Brando responded with mock sincerity,

"Well, by God, I am going to try right now." With that, he made a

few straining, unsuccessful attempts to raise out of his wheelchair.

But then he gave it his all, stood up completely, and went tap dancing

out of the establishment, much to the shock of the Bible thumper, and

much to the boisterous laughter of the other men in wheelchairs.

I choose to believe this story is true and that it, in effect,

created the scene when drunk Ray Teal comes over and starts patronizing

the characters played by Brando and Richard Erdman. Brando asks Ray

Teal, "Let me ask you something, mister. Could I marry your daughter?"

A sarcastic banter ensues and eventually Brando punches out Teal who

seemed to be discovering his type casting mold as an obnoxious

character who gets punched out ("Best Years of Our Lives") and a

bartender in Brando films ("The Wild One" and "One Eyed Jacks")

I'd like to ad a personal note to authenticate the serious message

of "The Men." Over ten years ago I taught a Japanese secondary

student whose English ability was extremely low. But her desire, her

drive, and her determination to learn were extremely high. After about

a year of struggle with words and sentences, she wrote her first

authentic essay for me. I had assigned an essay about someone she

admired. She wrote about her father who had lost his legs in an

industrial accident, but whose desire, drive, and determination to

become independent were extremely high. She concluded with, "My

father has learned to do many things. But the most difficult thing he

has learned is how to accept help for those things he really can't do."

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