Stage Fright (1950)

Approved   |    |  Film-Noir, Mystery, Thriller


Stage Fright (1950) Poster

A struggling actress tries to help a friend prove his innocence when he's accused of murdering the husband of a high society entertainer.


7.1/10
12,643

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


26 November 2001 | boris-26
Not a total Hitchcock misfire
STAGE FRIGHT (1950), whicch is usually dismissed as an Alfred Hitchcock failure, really has some fascinating things in it. As a whole, the film feels empty. The viewer knows they saw masterful construction work, but with lousy glue.

Richard Todd plays a Londoner wrongly accused of murdering his mistresses' husband. He is befriended by a young actress (Jane Wyman), her eccentric dad (Alister Sim, perfect as a daffy version of a Brit gentleman)

This film has arresting female characters (Marlene Dietrich is great as Todd's gal-pal. Patricia Hitchcock makes a top-grade debut in her father's films, and Kay Walsh is unforgettable as a blackmailer.)

The film begins in mid chase, has a terrific long take during a flashback, several other chases across and around stages and outdoor performances. The finale in a cluttered, noir-ish prop room is good stuff. What truly mars the film is the uninteresting sub-plot with detective Michael Wilding.

Critic Reviews



Did You Know?

Trivia

Cole Porter's song, "The Laziest Gal in Town", ran afoul of censors for its sexual innuendo, and for being too risqué. Several lines from the song were reworded, and the tamer version appears in this movie.


Quotes

Eve Gill: Any sign of the police?
Jonathan Cooper: No, no sign. Looks like we're getting away with it.
Eve Gill: Good.
Jonathan Cooper: How far is it to your father's boat?
Eve Gill: Two hours, with luck. You're luck seems to be very good. Touching wood.


Goofs

Alistair Sim's character's hands do not match the accordion notes he is supposedly playing.


Alternate Versions

A French VHS released in the nineties contained two versions of the film: one dubbed, the other subtitled. Beside this difference numerous edits were made in the dubbed version. Many scenes were shortened such as the talk between Eve and her father outside the boathouse in the night, Eve's attempt to disguise herself as a maid... However, and more importantly, this version contained two longer scenes not present in any copy released on VHS or DVD so far.

  • The first one is an extension of the bar discussion scene between the maid and the other patrons, right before Eve asks Wilfred Smith "Don't you think she's talking too much?" The dialog is dubbed in French.
  • The second scene is a slightly but magnificent longer version of Marlene Dietrich singing "The Laziest Gal in Town". The complete song runs 4 minutes instead of 3.37 in the edited version. The cut occurs after the first "it's not 'cause I couldn't" in the lyrics.


Soundtracks

Love Is Lyrical (Whisper Sweet Little Nothing to Me)
(1950) (uncredited)
Written by
Mischa Spoliansky
Performed by Marlene Dietrich

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Film-Noir | Mystery | Thriller

Box Office

Budget:

$1,437,000 (estimated)

Contribute to this page

What to Watch: December's Movie and TV Picks

Looking for something new to watch in December? Here are some picks to fill your Watchlist.

Get some picks

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com