Stage Fright (1950)

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Stage Fright (1950) Poster

A struggling actress tries to help a friend prove his innocence when he's accused of murdering the husband of a high society entertainer.


7.1/10
11,543

Photos

  • Marlene Dietrich and Richard Todd in Stage Fright (1950)
  • Joyce Grenfell in Stage Fright (1950)
  • Marlene Dietrich and Richard Todd in Stage Fright (1950)
  • Marlene Dietrich and Alfred Hitchcock in Stage Fright (1950)
  • Alfred Hitchcock and Jane Wyman in Stage Fright (1950)
  • "Stage Fright" Marlene Dietrich 1950/Warner Bros.

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


17 October 1999 | boy-13
7
| A solid, entertaining Hitch flick
Often considered to be one of Alfred Hitchcock's lesser known films, "Stage Fright" has unfortunately gotten a bad wrap. Even mediocre Hitchcock is better than most movies ever get, though. And this one is a solid, entertaining picture. With an eclectic cast one doesn't expect to see together, each diverse actor provides a little something for everyone. And with Jane Wyman, Marlene Dietrich, Richard Todd and Michael Wilding how can you go wrong?

Wyman convincingly plays a drama student who gets involved over her head in a purely Hitchcockian case of murder. When her ex-lover Todd is suspected of killing Dietrich's husband, Wyman hides him and helps him allude the police. Meanwhile, Wyman disguises herself as Dietrich's maid to help find evidence to save Todd's freedom. Wyman falls into a dangerous trap, and danger surrounds her.

Disappointingly underdeveloped as it starts, "Stage Fright" eventually turns into a first-rate thriller. While Wyman has been better, Dietrich is hilariously catty and Todd is wickedly suspicious. This is undoubtedly a Hitchcock film all the way around, but adding a nice twist to the formula is a soaring, romantic soundtrack. A seriously satisfying film, "Stage Fright" hits most of the right notes.

Critic Reviews



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Did You Know?

Trivia

The scenes where Jane Wyman first enters Marlene Dietrich's house undercover, she introduces herself as Doris Tynsdale, but Dietrich refers to her first as Phyliss, then Elsie, then Doris, then lastly Mavis. It was classic dialogue play for Sir Alfred Hitchcock.


Quotes

Eve Gill: Any sign of the police?
Jonathan Cooper: No, no sign. Looks like we're getting away with it.
Eve Gill: Good.
Jonathan Cooper: How far is it to your father's boat?
Eve Gill: Two hours, with luck. You're luck seems to be very good. Touching wood.


Goofs

When Charlotte is testing a black dress, she holds a lit cigarette which disappears between shots.


Alternate Versions

A French VHS released in the nineties contained two versions of the film: one dubbed, the other subtitled. Beside this difference numerous edits were made in the dubbed version. Many scenes were shortened such as the talk between Eve and her father outside the boathouse in the night, Eve's attempt to disguise herself as a maid... However, and more importantly, this version contained two longer scenes not present in any copy released on VHS or DVD so far.

  • The first one is an extension of the bar discussion scene between the maid and the other patrons, right before Eve asks Wilfred Smith "Don't you think she's talking too much?" The dialog is dubbed in French.
  • The second scene is a slightly but magnificent longer version of Marlene Dietrich singing "The Laziest Gal in Town". The complete song runs 4 minutes instead of 3.37 in the edited version. The cut occurs after the first "it's not 'cause I couldn't" in the lyrics.


Soundtracks

Eve's Rhapsody
(1950) (uncredited)
Music by
Leighton Lucas
Played on the piano

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Film-Noir | Thriller

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