User Reviews (9)

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  • dcole-226 September 2000
    Warning: Spoilers
    Well made little thriller with good performances. It's very well shot but has a few script problems (the villain has the heroine at gunpoint, doesn't shoot her, but shoots everyone around her..?). Still, very enjoyable and worth seeing. Director Terence Fisher does an admirable job.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    A young woman, Barbara (Rona Anderson), arrives in England on hearing the news that her wealthy businessman father has died - apparently committing suicide. At a shooting party on her country estate, a man is found murdered on the marshes. Barbara and her boyfriend, Robert (Guy Rolfe), turn detective believing the death to be connected with that of her father's. They open the safe at her father's office and learn that it is being used as a link in a dope racket. It becomes clear that her father found this out and was murdered by his business partner, Wainwright (Francis Lister), who was part of the gang. But, Wainwright's accomplice, is aware that the couple are on his tail and they are confronted by him alone in the country house at night...

    Content wise, it is utterly formulaic British second feature stuff but under Terence Fisher's direction - an early film for him made about five years before he became a key creative figure in the British horror boom via Hammer - it is lifted from being a mediocre to a good film (for its kind). The scenes in and around Rona Anderson's country estate are especially effective with Reg Wyer's b/w lighting making them sinister and shivery. Rona Anderson and Guy Rolfe are cheerful and likable as the standard b-pic hero and heroine while Alan Wheatley is excellent as the head of the criminal gang working as the head of a widow and orphans charity as a cover. Look out for Stanley Baker too as a family servant who is determined to save Anderson from Wheatley's clutches. The film was produced by Lance Comfort who was a prolific second feature director throughout the 1950's and early 60's including such films as Eight O' Clock Walk, Tomorrow At Ten, Blind Corner and Pit Of Darkness.

    Home To Danger is now available on DVD on Renown Pictures coupled with Montgomery Tully's espionage drama Master Spy.
  • It starts very innocently with no danger at all as there is only one old man dead by suicide, at it seems. Guy Rolfe is there to help the young heiress Barbara (Rona Anderson) who gradually appears as a target for someone who wants to kill her for some reason, but at the shooting party organised for her execution, someone mysteriously shoots the executioner, whom no one in the vicinity has ever seen before. The plot and the mystery thickens.

    There is a backward boy at the stables who stammers and seems to generally falter in everything he does, but he knows something and sees what no one else sees and makes observations. This is perhaps the most important and interesting character in the film, and he will continue acquiring more importance to the bitter end, as more and more people get murdered one way or the other, and there are some very nice foggy London scenes at night when Rona and Guy break in to investigate some dark secrets. That's where the actual film and excitement starts, which then mercilessly will increase to the desperate end.

    The backward groom with something of a zombie about him is actually Stanley Baker at an early stage. He remains the most fascinating character, nothing wrong about the others, they are all excellent on a small scale, but the plot gets more and more knotty as it develops. There is more than one murderer here, and they will all surprise you.
  • Despite a few rather daft plot holes, this proved to be quite an half decent murder mystery from Terence Fisher. "Barbara Cummings" (Rona Anderson) inherits a half share in a business and a country pile from her estranged father and sets off to visit her new estate - pursued by a coterie of hangers-on including Guy Rolfe ("Robert"). Whilst there, a stranger is killed during a grouse shoot; the police are called and only local simpleton Stanley Baker ("Willie") recalls seeing him before - a recollection that sows suspicion in Cummings' mind about how her father died. Was he murdered? Was his business partner up to something? Is "Robert" as genuine as he seems? All these questions must be answered if the truth is to be established.... The plot is not exactly rocket science, but it's well put together with some reasonably well paced action/dialogue and probably the best performance (?) I've seen from Stanley Baker.
  • malcolmgsw17 December 2012
    Warning: Spoilers
    This is the type of thriller where the ends don't all join up.What we know for certain from the very beginning is that Alan Wheatley is the murderer,simply because this is the role that he plays in nearly every film.However what is not quite as clear is why he is doing in all and sundry.We have Stanley Baker in a very early role playing a servant who is prepared to go to any lengths to protect his mistress.However there are too many unanswered questions.Like what is funny old Peter Jones doing in a role of a hit-man.Why is Alan Wheatley the head of a children's charity and a drug dealer at the same time.I could raise many points like this but none have a satisfactory answer.Thankfully it only lasts just over an hour so not much chance of getting bored.
  • HOME TO DANGER is one of Terence Fisher's most nondescript films as director. It's a low budget little thriller, set in and around a country house, that involves the death of a wealthy man and the reading of his will. His daughter inherits the estate and allows the owners of a small charity to live in the property with her, but somebody who is determined to get their hands on the wealth is willing to kill for it.

    It's predictable and cheap-looking stuff indeed, and the most notable thing about the production is Fisher's direction, which makes the film look more expensive and stylish than it is. Otherwise the story plods along a bit and the performances are anything but invigorating. Rona Anderson has done better work elsewhere, Guy Rolfe feels somehow extraneous as the heroic character shoehorned into the plot, and only a youthful Stanley Baker really shines as the simple-minded manservant. I also found it hard to warm to a bunch of characters who took obvious delight in the killing of wildlife. The use of stirring music at the climax brings to mind the James Bernard score of Fisher's Dracula.
  • Warning: Spoilers
    A woman returns to England after the death of her father and inherits his property. There are however people who don't want her to inherit and attempts are made on her life. She and an old friend investigate and doubts are raised about her father's death and how drug selling may be involved. It is a moderate mystery with the main villain being obvious. The best scenes are probably the duck hunting expedition and the chasing of the said main villain at the end. Otherwise Terence Fisher directs in a pedestrian way.

    Rona Anderson and Guy Rolfe as the main leads are given routine roles. More interesting are Peter Jones as a somewhat creepy Lips Leonard and the great Alan Wheatley as Hughes who quietly steals all the scenes he is in. Stanley Baker has a small part where he only has to look slightly mad but does it well enough. Dennis Harkin is amusing as Jimmy-The-One.

    The music score is provided by Malcolm Arnold no less but is not as memorable as a lot of his many others.
  • If, like myself, you were just wanting a glimpse of Stanley Baker before he was famous, don't bother. The man is literally unrecognisable, both facially and in screen personality, playing a mentally sub-normal servant in an elegant country house. Unfortunately he doesn't carry much conviction in the role, and just trogs about like the Holy Fool with Frankenstein thrown in. The Baker we love to hate was still a year or two away.

    You should remember that this was only a supporting feature, just over an hour long, and as such, it provides undemanding fare. Sixty years on, this is its charm, with every cliché in place, almost an Agatha Christie story, with a shooting-party, the regulation retired major, some deferential police, and an upper-class smoothie (Guy Rolfe) squiring an impossibly beautiful Rona Anderson as the heiress whose new fortune has suddenly put her life in danger. All flavoured with the blend of cut-glass English and Shepperton cockney, without which no 1951 thriller was complete.

    Alan Wheatley is just a little too unctuous as the boss of a children's charity, so we're not exactly unprepared for trouble in paradise. Terence Fisher's direction was generally praised, though it didn't really need that opening scene at the airport to establish that the young lady was returning from abroad. And Francis Lister fans may be interested to catch him here in his last film, still on fine form.
  • blanche-27 August 2019
    I love the British B noirs, but some of them are confusing - huge plot holes and a story that doesn't make sense.

    A young woman, Barbara Cummings (Rona Anderson) comes back to the family estate after the suicide of her father - if that's what it was. When the will is read, she inherits everything rather than it going to his business partner, where it was supposed to go initially. It's suggested by the solicitor that she continue to help the children's charity -- her father has left it 500 pounds, and she suggests that part of her home can go to house children.

    Well here's where it gets a little dicey. People are trying to kill her, having something to do with drugs. Somehow the head of this charity is involved. I admit I lost track. The business partner is involved as well, taking orders from someone who wants Barbara set up to be killed during a shooting party.

    Terence Fisher was a marvelous director. He really paid his dues with this one.

    Stanley Baker has a small part as a devoted albeit slow servant, and tall, distinguished Guy Rolfe is a family friend who has romantic designs on the heroine.

    This is the type of thriller where the ends don't all join up.What we know for certain from the very beginning is that Alan Wheatley is the murderer,simply because this is the role that he plays in nearly every film.However what is not quite as clear is why he is doing in all and sundry.We have Stanley Baker in a very early role playing a servant who is prepared to go to any lengths to protect his mistress.However there are too many unanswered questions.Like what is funny old Peter Jones doing in a role of a hit-man.Why is Alan Wheatley the head of a children's charity and a drug dealer at the same time.I could raise many points like this but none have a satisfactory answer.Thankfully it only lasts just over an hour so not much chance of getting bored.