Stop, You're Killing Me (1952)

Approved   |    |  Comedy, Musical


Stop, You're Killing Me (1952) Poster

After the repeal of Prohibition, a beer-maker decides to sell beer legally, but no one wants to buy his revolting beer, and he does not want to force sales.


6.4/10
225

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  • Broderick Crawford and Claire Trevor in Stop, You're Killing Me (1952)
  • Broderick Crawford and Claire Trevor in Stop, You're Killing Me (1952)
  • Broderick Crawford and Claire Trevor in Stop, You're Killing Me (1952)
  • Broderick Crawford in Stop, You're Killing Me (1952)
  • Virginia Gibson and Bill Hayes in Stop, You're Killing Me (1952)
  • Broderick Crawford and Claire Trevor in Stop, You're Killing Me (1952)

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User Reviews


19 November 2015 | bkoganbing
7
| Just as funny
In this remake of A Slight Case Of Murder, Broderick Crawford steps into the shoes of Edward G. Robinson in a remake of the film that had its origins as a Broadway play written by Damon Runyon. It was a flop play on Broadway in the Thirties but a roaring success as a film.

Both Crawford and Robinson in the leads of their respective films got a chance to burlesque the tough guy images both so carefully cultivated. Both looked like they were enjoying themselves on screen.

The film concerns the end of Prohibition and a gangster who made it big in the illegal beer racket now wants to go legitimate and gain some respectability. Crawford and his wife Claire Trevor rent a big country mansion near the Saratoga racetrack and throw a huge party. They want respectability not just for themselves but for daughter Virginia Gibson who is engaged into some upper crust WASP family.

But a robbery of bookies at Saratoga (remember this is set in the 30s before pari-mutual machines so the tracks had bookies to take bets) and the crooks using this 'abandoned' mansion as a hideout interrupt all those plans. Without revealing more all the legal and domestic and financial problems all get nicely resolved as the film concludes in a very funny way.

Other than some really unnecessary musical numbers the film is practically a carbon copy of the original. Stop, You're Killing Me is highly recommended as tonic for the funny bone.

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