Jungle Moon Men (1955)

Passed   |    |  Action, Adventure, Fantasy


Jungle Moon Men (1955) Poster

Priestess Oma is forever young in this Jungle Jim knockoff of "She" or the La of Opar stories from "Tarzan". The Jungle Jim type is played by Weissmuller using his own name.


5.9/10
258


Videos


Photos

  • Jean Byron and Johnny Weissmuller in Jungle Moon Men (1955)
  • Helene Stanton in Jungle Moon Men (1955)
  • Helene Stanton in Jungle Moon Men (1955)
  • William Henry and Helene Stanton in Jungle Moon Men (1955)
  • Jean Byron and Johnny Weissmuller in Jungle Moon Men (1955)
  • Jean Byron and Johnny Weissmuller in Jungle Moon Men (1955)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


20 May 2018 | richardchatten
4
| Pretty Deep Stuff
With a title like that I just had to see this! But the connection between the moon and the little people with blow-pipes led by Billy Curtis is only vaguely alluded to. It's actually the sun that figures more prominently in the plot, since it represents the great god Ra, from whose lethal rays wicked high priestess Oma has eternally to shelter from in the murkily lit temple over which she rules.

Jean Byron cuts an impressive figure in the usual lady explorer's pith helmet and tight black britches as archaeologist Ellen Marsten - author of 'The Historical Basis of African Civilisation' - and proves remarkably bloodthirsty when let loose on the local wildlife with a bow & arrow, but is subsequently reduced to little more than an onlooker (I wonder what she called the book on which she based her adventures here?) Helen (sic) Stanton, too, as Oma Who Must Be Obeyed, has the makings of a formidable villainess, but is otherwise little used; not helped by an ugly blonde wig and boring dress which between them look as if they had both been lying about in wardrobe at Columbia since the 40's.

Most of the film is set out of doors in the sunshine, which keeps the film pleasant to watch, until we enter Oma's temple, which cameraman Henry Freulich renders suitably noirishly atmospheric. However as a whole, the film felt far longer than 70 minutes.

Critic Reviews


Contribute to this page

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com