Great Day in the Morning (1956)

Approved   |    |  Action, Adventure, Drama


Great Day in the Morning (1956) Poster

A Confederate drifter wins a hotel-saloon at poker in Denver but two rival female admirers, local Union sympathizers, Southern gold miners and an orphaned boy complicate his life.


6.4/10
627

Photos

  • Ruth Roman in Great Day in the Morning (1956)
  • Virginia Mayo in Great Day in the Morning (1956)
  • Virginia Mayo and Robert Stack in Great Day in the Morning (1956)
  • Virginia Mayo, Ruth Roman, and Robert Stack in Great Day in the Morning (1956)
  • Virginia Mayo, Ruth Roman, and Robert Stack in Great Day in the Morning (1956)
  • Robert Stack in Great Day in the Morning (1956)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


15 June 2008 | dougdoepke
Overcrowded
Southerner Robert Stack wins a Denver saloon and bar girl (Ruth Roman) from crooked card dealer Raymond Burr on eve of Civil War. Trouble is that southerners are outnumbered in Union-leaning Colorado and need Stack's help to get big gold shipment to Dixie and the war effort. But Stack's only out for himself and is now in fat city with a saloon and a girl. So what's he going to do.

Good core plot, great Colorado scenery, ace director (Jacques Tourneur), and an A-picture budget, yet the results are mixed. For one thing, it looks like Stack's getting the big star build-up since he has to romance not only bar girl Roman but good girl Virginia Mayo too. That's about one girl too many for even the best Western. Here Mayo's part is really unnecessary and drags down the pacing. Besides, do we really care which movie star he ends up with. Still and all, it's fun to watch the girls' bra's duke it out in best 1950's uplift fashion. Also, subplot of orphaned boy (Donald McDonald) adds to what becomes a sprawling story that strays too far from the solid core.

Nonetheless, the cold-eyed Stack makes for a convincing gunman, while no movie with character great Leo Gordon could be a loss. Here he's in a typical role as a Union rowdy ready to fight at the proverbial drop of a hat. He's always reminded me of an early Lee Marvin, with the same virile presence and clarity of personality, but without Marvin's range. Also notable for fine support from the hulking Peter Whitney, a familiar Hollywood face for many years. His quiet scene with Stack remains the film's most intelligent and powerful.

The movie was made during that period when Hollywood had not yet learned to live with TV. Note that even budget-minded RKO comes up with a wide-screen process to show off the spectacular scenery that can't be done on TV. I expect the competition also accounts for the star-heavy treatment that ultimately crowds the plot and slows down events. But with a tighter script and leaner casting, this could have been a first-rate Western, especially considering the wonderfully done final scene.

Critic Reviews


Lance Reddick Talks Keanu, "The Wire," and "Bosch"

The acclaimed actor discusses working with Keanu Reeves in John Wick, his time on the hit drama "The Wire," and how he says the name of detective "Bosch."

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

Check out IMDb's San Diego Comic-Con coverage, featuring Kevin Smith as captain of the IMDboat, July 18 to 20, 2019, visit our guide to Star Wars, family entertainment, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com