Love Me Tender (1956)

Approved   |    |  Drama, Musical, Romance


Love Me Tender (1956) Poster

At the end of the Civil War, a Confederate team is ordered to rob a Union payroll train but the war ends leaving these men with their Union loot, until the Feds come looking for it.


6.2/10
3,565


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  • Love Me Tender (1956)
  • Elvis Presley on the set of "Love Me Tender," 20th Century Fox, 1956.
  • Debra Paget in Love Me Tender (1956)
  • Elvis Presley during a break from filming "Love Me Tender," 20th Century Fox, 1956.
  • Elvis Presley on the set of "Love Me Tender," 20th Century Fox, 1956.
  • Elvis Presley and Debra Paget on the set of "Love Me Tender," 20th Century Fox, 1956.

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21 February 2004 | Eireann
Solid movie with excellent introspective performances.
The fanfare of a young Elvis Presley and his first movie certainly was blinding when it came to this movie. It was hard for people to see past it, however, upon viewing the picture, Presley's star dims as he takes his seat at the table among some of the acting greats of cinema. The viewer relinquishes the idea that it's Elvis and accepts him as the doting youngest son of the Reno family.

Dramatic without being maudlin, the picture chronicles the lives of one family post-Civil War, and how each member dealt with the harsh realities of war. Hearing that the eldest son Vance (Egan) has died, Clint (Presley) and Vance's former love (Paget) marry in the aftermath of the murder of her parents and the Reno boys father. As is in wartime, things become increasingly more difficult when he and his two other brothers Brett (Campbell) and Ray (Drury) to find this, as well the spoils of war haunting them shortly upon their return.

It's an honest look at a difficult time in this country, with great performances all around -- from the handsome, impressive lead Richard Egan on down the cast. Egan's portrayal of Vance Reno is an amazing performance -- restrained without being stolid, much as men were during the time. Egan gives glimpses into the inner turmoil that sits just below the characters surface, making the character heartbreakingly sympathetic and admirable.

It's Elvis Presley's best performance and (dare I say only worthwhile) role and film. Upon reflection, his co-stars helped to elevate him into something more than what followed (with films) and Presley really seems to have taken this one seriously. Regardless of whether you're a Presley fan or not, the understated performances, simple but effective storyline and message, and moving conclusion make this a must see.

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