Tea and Sympathy (1956)

Approved   |    |  Drama


Tea and Sympathy (1956) Poster

Tom Lee is a sensitive boy of 17 whose lack of interest in the "manly" pursuits of sports, mountain climbing and girls labels him "sister-boy" at the college he is attending. Head master ... See full summary »


7.3/10
2,047

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  • Deborah Kerr in Tea and Sympathy (1956)
  • John Kerr at an event for Tea and Sympathy (1956)
  • Deborah Kerr and John Kerr in Tea and Sympathy (1956)
  • Deborah Kerr in Tea and Sympathy (1956)
  • Tea and Sympathy (1956)
  • John Kerr in Tea and Sympathy (1956)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


30 September 2008 | MarieGabrielle
8
| Rather than analyzing it to death...
This film came to audiences at a rather schizophrenic time, things were changing, but not that much. Roles were assimilated, but not too drastically. People were questioning things, as long as it wasn't radical.

Women were still patronized, there were still clear role boundaries (witness the scene where Tom is knitting and catches derision for spending ten minutes in a sewing circle.) Not sure why that was a crime of the century, but whatever.

Deborah Kerr is tender and memorable as an unhappy wife to the school master at a prep school who realizes her marriage is a sham. She realizes this when she sympathizes with a student and resident at her home, a confused young man who simply is shy and has doubts about his future. There are some nuances regarding sexuality, but in all honesty that was a side-story, from what I inferred.

The message I take away from this film is not simply about ostracism and hatred; Minnelli as director also addresses female emotion, the reasons why Kerr empathizes with the young man, and how he eventually moves on. In the long rung, it is life affirming, although rather opaque in its message.

Discrimination and hatred take many forms, and sometimes the subtler forms are most repellent. Highly recommended. 8/10.

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