Artie Ravidge: A real troublemaker, that one. But don't you worry; this stuff'll move, it'll move. When I get done with him, he won't bother us no more.

Alan Mitchell: What are you going to do?

Artie Ravidge: Never mind. I'm going to educate that Union real good to lay off us.

Alan Mitchell: Dad, are you going to let him...?

Walter Mitchell: What do you want me to do? Give in to them? Let the Union take over? That's what'll happen once they grab hold. With their hours, and benefits, and guarantees... three percent of the payroll for retirement, two percent for health, two percent for vacations... always with their hands stuck out for more. The only thing a boss can be sure of these days is an early heart attack. Who guarantees me anything?

Alan Mitchell: How do other manufacturers get along...?

Walter Mitchell: I don't care about the others. I built this place with my own hands and nobody's going to tell me how to run it. I wanna be my own boss. Do you understand? My own boss.

Alan Mitchell: That still doesn't give you the right to keep a hoodlum on the payroll.

Artie Ravidge: Oh, this boy, when he gives it to you... right under the belt. Mr "Junior Executive", when you learn the facts of life in this business...

Alan Mitchell: Oh, I learned enough already. But never once did I hear anything about right or wrong.

Walter Mitchell: [pause] There's no such thing in the garment business.

Alan Mitchell: You wouldn't talk to me yesterday so I went to the union. I heard them.

Walter Mitchell: You went to the union behind my back?

Alan Mitchell: I wanted to find out what was going on. I couldn't believe what they were saying. But now I know there must be something to it.

Walter Mitchell: You're taking their side against mine? My own son?

Alan Mitchell: I'm not taking any sides but when you start hiring thugs to beat people up and threaten to kill them

Artie Ravidge: Just a minute.

Artie Ravidge: Protection's my business. That's how I give your father. And nobody gets hurt unless he asks for it...

Theresa Renata: Who's your good- looking friend?

Tulio Renata: Oh, he's here on business.

Theresa Renata: Business? What kind of business? You're my business.

Tulio Renata: Keep out of it.

Theresa Renata: Listen, if it's to help organize those non-union shops, get somebody else.

Theresa Renata: You want to be hero for the union? Go organize the devils in hell!

Dave Bronson: [Speaking at the funeral of a murdered union organizer] When a union loses a Tulio Renata, it may well weep, for the Tulio Renata's can never be replaced. Even in a union like others where so many have given so much for the betterment of others. Every bone in his body, every drop of his blood, everything that a man had to give, he gave for this union. Tulio was every man's friend as he believed that every man was his friend. Yes, the Tulio Renata's belong to all mankind for we were his life. Everything he did, he did for us, not for himself, not for his family, but as Tulio dedicated himself, so we shall pledge ourselves to his memory. All 400,000 of us.

Walter Mitchell: Well, you decided on anything?

Alan Mitchell: I thought I would go into the garment business with you.

Walter Mitchell: The garment business?

Alan Mitchell: That is if the offer is still open.

Walter Mitchell: You never wanted to before. What made you change your mind?

Alan Mitchell: Oh, I guess being away changed my mind about a lot of things. Don't you want me to?

Alan Mitchell: What father doesn't want his son in the business with him, but I've been doing some thinking too. I'd rather you stayed out.

Walter Mitchell: I built this place with my own hands and nobody's gonna tell me how to run it. I want to be my own boss, do you understand? My own boss!

Alan Mitchell: That still doesn't give you the right to keep a hoodlum on the payroll.

Artie Ravidge: Oh, this boy when he gives it to you? Right under the belt. Mr. Junior Executive, when you learn the facts of life in this business.

Alan Mitchell: Oh, I've learned enough already. But never once did I ever hear anything about what is right or wrong.

Walter Mitchell: There's no such thing in the garment business.

[Alan starts to leave]

Walter Mitchell: Where are you going?

Alan Mitchell: To vomit.

Walter Mitchell: What do you mean join the union? What kind of talk is that from a partner?

Fred Kenner: If we ran a union shop, we would never...

Walter Mitchell: We would go broke making this dress. Look at these all these operations. Look! Look at these operations. We've got to get it made for less. Cut the workers.

Fred Kenner: We could make enough for profit and give the workers a living wage if you didn't give hoodlums a percentage out of every dress to keep the union out. And I don't care who hears it.

Walter Mitchell: You take care of your end of the business, I'll take care of mine. You're a designer. Design! Take this down to the cutting room. Leave running the firm to me

Fred Kenner: I left it and you let hoodlums in. Well, I'm kicking 'em out. We can run a union shop.

Walter Mitchell: I'll never let that lousy union into my place. Never!

Fred Kenner: This is my shop too. I'm a full partner!

Walter Mitchell: I'll pay the workers how much I want, not how much I'll make you pay.