Wild Is the Wind (1957)

Not Rated   |    |  Drama


Wild Is the Wind (1957) Poster

An immigrant Nevada rancher brings a woman from Italy to be his second wife but when he neglects her, she becomes involved with his trusted assistant. Nominated for 3 Academy Awards including Best Actor.


6.7/10
859

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


24 December 2007 | jcappy
7
| Parallels With "La Strada"
Cukor's "Wild is the Wind" seems to be a kind of tribute to Fellini's classic "La Strada." He made his film just a couple years later, and sets it up along very similar lines. He selects Antony Quinn, Zampano for Fellini, to be his male lead, Gino. And chooses the forceful Anna Magnani (Gioia) to equal Guiletta Masina's rather astonishing performance in the central role of Gelsomina in "La Strada."

Gino, the Nevada ranch owner, is the same kind of brutish, brooding hunk as is the strong man performer in "La Strada." They act in the masculine mode, determined, gusty, sometimes cruel, and in different senses, heroically alone. It is perhaps the poverty of the former and Gino's outsider status (Italian in Nevada) that open each up to change, and redemption. Each, however, is hardened against the actual woman--whoseservice he demands, and whose body he exploits--who offers that change.

Gioia, like her parallel, Gelsomina, is a replacement for a dead sister. Zampano purchases Gelsomina after his Rosa dies. Gino orders Gioia as a mail order bride to replace his wife who died after several desperate attempts to give him a child. Both women find themselves trapped in a feelingless, cold, abusive relationship, removed from human response and the natural world. They are owned--body and soul, and are, of course, interchangeable with their sisters.

But Gioia's resistance, like that of her predecessor, is central. Each woman is engaged, through a compelling range of small acts and facial expressions--they are FACES above all else--in a form of survival which doubles as opposition. What the man denies, they affirm, what he kills, they save. Each is strongly in touch with the needless suffering endured by humans and animals, and are sickened by the acts that cause it . And each is more bold than pleasing, more spirited than spiritual, and more troubling than tamed.

Both women have one or two male allies who bear some similarity. Bene (Tony Francioso) seems related to "La Strada"s tightrope walker (Richard Basehart): both men serving as alternative male's who have understanding and sympathy for these held women, and for the natural world they defend. They create space an breathing room--Bene's lust seems out of character. And then too each, in the end, leaves these women to the mercy of their oppressive situation. (Alberto, Gino's older brother, is perhaps a more practical ally than these two, however: it is his unusually direct and touching challenge to his brother that forces him to perceive Gioia as a person.)

All the major roles of La Strada are more convincing and consistent, and thus the ending is more powerful. Gino's redemption is also secured at a much lower cost than Zampano's, which has to do with the weaker script/plot than and not his less rigid nature. However "Wild is the Wind," given Cukor's Hollywood models and restraints, measures up quite well to Fellini's classic.

Critic Reviews


More Like This

The Rose Tattoo

The Rose Tattoo

Lust for Life

Lust for Life

Bhowani Junction

Bhowani Junction

Pat and Mike

Pat and Mike

L'amore

L'amore

The Big Knife

The Big Knife

A Double Life

A Double Life

It Should Happen to You

It Should Happen to You

A Hatful of Rain

A Hatful of Rain

Zorba the Greek

Zorba the Greek

The Cardinal

The Cardinal

The L-Shaped Room

The L-Shaped Room

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Drama

'Hamilton' Stars Through the Years

From Jack in Mary Poppins Returns to Lee Scoresby in "His Dark Materials," take a look back at the TV and movie roles of Lin-Manuel Miranda and the stars of Hamilton.

See the full gallery

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com