Vertigo (1958)

PG   |    |  Mystery, Romance, Thriller


Vertigo (1958) Poster

A former police detective juggles wrestling with his personal demons and becoming obsessed with a hauntingly beautiful woman.


8.3/10
326,984

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  • Vertigo (1958)
  • James Stewart and Kim Novak in Vertigo (1958)
  • Alfred Hitchcock and Kim Novak in Vertigo (1958)
  • James Stewart in Vertigo (1958)
  • James Stewart and Kim Novak in Vertigo (1958)
  • Kim Novak in Vertigo (1958)

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6 July 2002 | tfrizzell
Get Lost in It.
Along with "Psycho", Hitchcock's best film that wraps itself around the viewer very fast and never does let go. San Francisco detective Jimmy Stewart is slowly going crazy due to a failed mission which did not work because of his intense fear of heights. This is all front-page news of course and Stewart is shamed about the whole event. But a ray of light shines as he gets a job to watch a man's wife (Kim Novak) who is supposedly having an affair with another man. Stewart believes this is his chance to put the past behind him, but sometimes the future is even darker. Stewart falls in love with Novak and the love turns into a dark and twisted obsession that becomes deeper and deeper as the film progresses. When tragedy strikes, that is the end. Right? Not quite. An amazing screenplay and arguably Hitchcock's greatest directing venture make the film solid and Stewart's stunning performance raises the whole project to a classic level. Somewhat ignored around the awards circuit in 1958, but ages beautifully as the years go by. 5 stars out of 5.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Sir Alfred Hitchcock was embittered at the critical and commercial failure of this movie in 1958. He blamed this on James Stewart for "looking too old" to attract audiences any more. Hitchcock never worked with Stewart, previously one of his favorite collaborators, again.


Quotes

Officer on rooftop: Give me your hand. Give me your hand.


Goofs

When Scottie and Madeleine are driving on a forested highway, the car appears to be on the wrong (left) side of the road.


Crazy Credits

The opening Paramount logo is in black and white while the rest of the film, including the closing Paramount logo, is in Technicolor.


Alternate Versions

An addition to the ending was made for some European coutries due to certain laws prohibiting a film from letting a "bad guy" get away at the end of a film. In the new ending, after Scottie looks down from the belltower (the original ending) there is a shot of Midge sitting next to a radio listening to reports of police tracking down Gavin Elster. As Midge turns off the radio the news flash also reports that 3 Berkeley students got caught bringing a cow up the stairs of a campus building. Scottie enters the room, looks at Midge plainly, and then looks out a window. Midge makes two drinks and gives one to Scottie. It ends with both of them looking out the window. This ending can be found on the restoration laserdisc.


Soundtracks

Symphony No. 34 in C K. 338, 2nd Movement, Andante di Molto (piu tosto allegretto)
(uncredited)
Composed by
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Played as 'cue 10B' on a record in the psychiatric ward

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Mystery | Romance | Thriller

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