The Sky Calls (1959)

  |  Adventure, Sci-Fi


The Sky Calls (1959) Poster

Two countries race to have the first successful landing on Mars.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

4.5/10
622

Photos

  • The Sky Calls (1959)
  • Sergey Filimonov and Aleksandr Shvorin in The Sky Calls (1959)
  • Aleksandr Shvorin and Taisiya Litvinenko in The Sky Calls (1959)
  • Lev Lobov in The Sky Calls (1959)
  • Ivan Pereverzev in The Sky Calls (1959)
  • Konstantin Bartashevich and Gurgen Tonunts in The Sky Calls (1959)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Cast & Crew

Top Billed Cast



Directors:

Mikhail Karzhukov , Aleksandr Kozyr , Francis Ford Coppola

Writers:

Mikhail Karzhukov, Evgeniy Pomeshchikov, Aleksey Sazonov

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


30 April 2014 | spintongues
4
| jingoist schlock
Like most soviet films of the period (and I watched the original version), in has no action whatsoever. The plot is stilted as statues at the People's Economy Achievements Exhibition in Moscow, and the story drags its feet to no end. It is a typical tableau vivant aimed at kicking imperialist America one more time, and at showing Russians (but mostly Ukrainians, as the film was done at the infamous Dovzhenko Studios, legendary for its spectacularly bad productions) at their best and foremost.

However, this propaganda poster about how Soviets and Americans tried to prove to each other whose penis extender—pardon me, phallic symbol—is better, racing each other to Mars, of all places, is nicely illustrated with analog FX. The music is abominable, and is in place only in the scene of "space madness" of the one "bad American" they let out into space. The dialogue is absurdist and as ridiculous as the gadgetry shown. More than anything else, it reminds me of the old Chapayev joke: —Pet'ka, the apparatus. —Six, Vasily Ivanovich. —Six what? —Apparatus what? In some sense, it's just as silly as Gravity. Look how much time passed, and what has changed?

Nevertheless, content-wise, the film's narrow-minded positivism and typical soviet jingoism is set off by one truly Pynchonian twist, and you can appreciate it if you read Gravity's Rainbow. The film has its own Gottfried, and there is the Gottfried glorious moment there. A-and Gottfried's name in the film is Grigory.

Critic Reviews


How Ricky Whittle Brings Shadow Moon to Life

Ricky Whittle, the star at the center of "American Gods," credits amazing co-stars and killer special effects for his mind-bending performance.

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to the SXSW 2019, what to watch on TV, and a look back at the 2018-2019 awards season.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com