La Dolce Vita (1960)

Not Rated   |    |  Comedy, Drama


La Dolce Vita (1960) Poster

A series of stories following a week in the life of a philandering paparazzo journalist living in Rome.


8/10
61,597

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  • Anita Ekberg in La Dolce Vita (1960)
  • Magali Noël in La Dolce Vita (1960)
  • Marcello Mastroianni and Yvonne Furneaux in La Dolce Vita (1960)
  • Federico Fellini and Lex Barker at an event for La Dolce Vita (1960)
  • Magali Noël in La Dolce Vita (1960)
  • Magali Noël in La Dolce Vita (1960)

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26 November 2000 | guimo
Soberty of monday morning...
(first of all, sorry my poor english) Who, in this entire world, drunk as a horse in the middle of the night, never discovered the meaning of life, that it can be so easy and joyfull that hurts. This happens with a certain frequency. The big problem is, after all that, to face all the thoughts and conclusions in a sober monday morning, when everything is just real, concious and above all that sincere. This is the the big question and problem of Marcello Rubini, a reporter of a gossip magazines who has to deal with the fact that he tastes the same poison he spreads by leaving in a group of people which he sucks his living.

In a moment he is directing his papparazzi and, in the next, he is running away from them. He flows between all kinds of social circles and the only impression he gives is that it doesnt matter what kind of craziness you are getting into everything is a big cliché. From the mainstream world of a gorgeous actress who feels able to express opinions about everything (and we buy it), passing throught the religious world of the faith, and also an intellectual circle that gives a fake impression of freedom, everything turns out to be an escape. That blonde girl appears as a stroke of pureness and sincereness, something we should really look for, but we just dont. In the case of Marcello's life, writing is the solutions he always substitute for vain experiences. Something he likes and that he needs a young girl to tell him that. That litlle cute girl is a person Marcello would like to be, someone who faces the soberty of a monday morning with hopeness and happiness.

A masterpiece.

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