Flaming Star (1960)

Approved   |    |  Action, Drama, Romance


Flaming Star (1960) Poster

When fighting breaks out between two cultures in West Texas, the mixed-blood Pacer tries to act as a peacemaker, but the "flaming star of death" pulls him irrevocably into the deadly violence.


6.5/10
3,093

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


3 April 2002 | moonspinner55
5
| "Every man/Has a flaming star/A flaming star/Over his shoulder"
Half-breed Elvis Presley is caught between warring sides in the Old West circa 1870. Clair Huffaker's book, adapted by Huffaker and the esteemed Nunnally Johnson, has now become a vehicle for the leading man, and Presley the Actor never really did carve out his niche on the movie screen. He's a quiet, some may say stolid, presence, acting a great deal just with his eyes--though one aches for him to loosen up. The hot "Elvis Sings Songs From Flaming Star" album is much preferable to the movie, which cuts the musical performances down to a minimal two. The film has some action, a fine supporting cast, lots of melodrama; the critics liked it and certainly Charles G. Clarke's beautiful cinematography is worth seeing in widescreen. ** from ****

Critic Reviews


Did You Know?

Trivia

The original title for this movie was "Black Star". Elvis Presley even recorded a song by that name. After the title was changed he re-recorded the song, using the same words and melody but changing the word "black" to "flaming". The song "Black Star" was unreleased for years, until it appeared on the Elvis boxed set "Collectors Gold" in 1991.


Quotes

Dred Pierce: If you hurt that child, I'll get you, you godless savage!
Pacer Burton: Stay where you are, Pierce!
Ben Ford: You heard Dred, Indian! Any harm comes to that girl and you're dead in a minute!
Pacer Burton: Just keep talkin', Ford and you'll be dead now!


Goofs

When Sam Burton is hit deadly by three Indian arrows in his back, the Indian Warrior who shot the last arrow into his victim approaches the dying man in order to take his scalp. Sam lies with the front of his body to the ground the three arrows protruding out of his back. The Indian reaches Sam, turns him around and is shot by Sam who uses his last vitality strength to kill his murderer: to achieve this goal he has to lift his right arm to fire his colt on the Indian Brave thereby revealing that the three arrows that had been sticking in his back one second before are gone! They are not broken but still sticking in his body as would be the case in real life, no, they have dissolved into nothingness.


Soundtracks

A Cane And A High Starched Collar
Written by
Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett (as Roy Bennett)
Performed by Elvis Presley
Vocal Accompaniment by The Jordanaires

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Action | Drama | Romance | Western

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