G.I. Blues (1960)

PG   |    |  Comedy, Musical


G.I. Blues (1960) Poster

Tulsa, a soldier with dreams of running his own nightclub, places a bet with his friend Dynamite that he can win the heart of an untouchable dancer...but when Dynamite is transferred, Tulsa must replace him in the bet.


6.3/10
3,013

Photos

  • Elvis Presley and Juliet Prowse filming "G.I. Blues," Paramount, 1960.
  • Elvis Presley and Juliet Prowse in "G.I. Blues," Paramount, 1960.
  • Elvis Presley and Juliet Prowse in G.I. Blues (1960)
  • Loyal Griggs and James Grant in G.I. Blues (1960)
  • Elvis Presley and Juliet Prowse in G.I. Blues (1960)
  • James Grant in G.I. Blues (1960)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


21 December 2007 | bkoganbing
7
| Jump Starting The Career of The King Again
GI Blues was Elvis Presley's fifth picture and first one since his return from the Army as America's most celebrated draftee of the Fifties. It also marked his first film with director Norman Taurog who did nine films with the King.

Taurog like so many in Hollywood in front of and behind the camera was getting less and less employment and taking what he could get. These were the kind of people that Elvis's manager Colonel Tom Parker made sure helped his meal ticket in any way possible. Norman Taurog won an Oscar in 1931 for Skippy and was nominated for his direction of Boys Town in 1938 which won Spencer Tracy an Oscar. Over the years Taurog directed such musical performers as Bing Crosby, Dean Martin, Mario Lanza, Eddie Fisher, and Debbie Reynolds. This man was most assuredly a help to the King's career and I've no doubt Parker was behind getting him.

Parker is a controversial figure, especially among Elvis's legion of fans as to whether he helped or hindered Elvis's career. He might have done a little of both, but one thing the man was always sure of is that in Presley's movies, he made sure that he got the best support in front and behind the camera. Norman Taurog extended his own career via the King. Everybody made out here.

The Colonel also was a master at keeping the publicity going while Elvis was a $78.00 a month GI serving in Germany. So much so there was a tremendous about of advance publicity about this film which was about a young rock and rolling soldier who finds love in Frankfurt.

Elvis gets hooked into a Guys and Dolls type bet that he can't spend the night in Juliet Prowse's apartment. Prowse is a local entertainer at one of the clubs in Frankfurt and she's got a reputation as one cold lady. But you know she ain't got a chance with the king.

Part of the publicity surrounding this film was Juliet Prowse's relationship with another guy she did a film with that year, Frank Sinatra. She and Sinatra were quite the item and they announced their engagement and then broke it off just as quickly. Juliet was quite the dancer both in GI Blues and in Can-Can. I remember all of this quite well as a lad. And it was always a special treat in Elvis films when he got a female co-star who was also musical like Ann-Margret, Nancy Sinatra, or Juliet Prowse.

Elvis had a bunch of songs in the film including his own Blue Suede Shoes playing on a jukebox during a bar brawl. One song I really liked was Pocketful of Rainbows which he sings to Juliet while riding in a cable car. It should have been a bigger hit for him.

GI Blues was a fine jump start for Elvis's return to the big screen and to his loyal legion of fans.

Critic Reviews


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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film marked a turning point in Elvis Presley's screen persona. Up until his stint in the U.S. Army, art imitated life, with Presley typically cast as a shy, unassuming country boy. Following his release from the armed services, Presley kicked off the hayseed, emerging as a slick, articulate bon vivant. He would occasionally mix the two personas, as in Wild in the Country (1961), but for the most part, Presley would veer toward the hip side for the rest of his career. That said, Presley's inability to obscure his drawl dictated that most of his characters came from the south.


Quotes

Tulsa McLean: Thanks, ma'am.
Lili: I don't like ma'am.
Tulsa McLean: Neither do I. Honey.


Goofs

In the opening scene when Elvis and another soldier are loading ammunition into the tank, the shells being loaded are much to large for the main tank gun, which was 90mm on the M48 tank.


Crazy Credits

After the opening credits: Produced with the full cooperation of the U.S. Army and the Department of Defense


Alternate Versions

Because of copyright problems, in the European version of the movie the song "Tonight Is So Right For Love" (by Sid Wayne and Abner Silver) which was based on the melody of "Bacarolle" by Jaques Offenbach, was substituted with "Tonight's All Right For Love" (by Wayne, Silver and Joe Lilley), which had similar lyrics but was based on the melody of "Tales From The Vienna Woods" by Johann Strauss.


Soundtracks

Didja Ever
Written by
Sid Wayne & Sherman Edwards
Performed by Elvis Presley

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Comedy | Musical

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