High Note (1960)

  |  Family, Animation, Comedy


High Note (1960) Poster

The sheet music for Johann Strauss' "The Blue Danube" is constructed by moving musical symbols. A baton-toting conductor note tries to direct his fellow notes in performing this musical ... See full summary »


7.4/10
390

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27 October 2017 | Dawalk-1
10
| Hitting All The Right Notes With Me.
I thought I remembered seeing this on T.V. growing up, but other reviewers claim it stopped airing sometime after the '70s or it rarely ever aired again. Now I'm not as sure as I thought I was. I still thought it seemed familiar to me somehow despite that. Anyway, this WB cartoon definitely accords with me. This would be on my favorites list and what I consider as one of the best of the '60s, especially before the DePatie-Freleng and W-7 Arts eras. I haven't listened to classical music as much as I have some, other genres. The closest I've come to that was through ragtime/novelty ragtime and prog rock, the latter particularly by the British band, Renaissance. One of the best music-themed shorts in the series and being a big music person, I'm into several of them involving music.

High Note is a highly innovative and entertaining short that features various things made out of musical notes, like them being turned into live stick figures, and anything else that's written on staff paper. The note/stick figure that's the conductor is trying to get the playing of the piece, The Blue Danube, going, is unable to do so due to a missing musical note who's drunk, which is the reason this cartoon got banned, depictions of alcoholism. Much of the rest of the presentation is spent trying to get the drunk musical note to return to its place in the opus so that it can be played completely and without interruption. But in the end, it still doesn't go as planned. A few, other, well-renowned songs are featured as well, such as "Oh, Where Has My Little Dog Gone".

Even when I was little/younger, I believe I would've appreciated this break out of the norm. That's why this, along with The Dot And The Line, are so special. An example of high class fine art at its highest and finest. Another Chuck Jones-directed favorite. I wasn't always so big on classical or classical-influenced music, but maybe that's because I haven't found those songs that truly grabbed me. The compositions are nice, as is everything else about this. I've been a little more appreciative of it since. I can't wait till this finally makes its way onto DVD release. Recommended. Edit: I found out that this short has been available on DVD for over a couple years now, since I found out on the Looney Tunes Wiki that it's been released as part of Looney Tunes: Musical Masterpieces, in case anyone else besides me is interested.

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Genres

Family | Animation | Comedy | Short | Music

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