Mister Ed (1958–1966)

TV Series   |  TV-G   |    |  Comedy, Family, Fantasy


Episode Guide
Mister Ed (1958) Poster

The misadventures of a wisecracking talking horse and his human owner.

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7.1/10
3,142

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  • Alan Young in Mister Ed (1958)
  • Alan Young and Mister Ed in Mister Ed (1958)
  • Connie Hines in Mister Ed (1958)
  • Leon Ames and Florence MacMichael in Mister Ed (1958)
  • Connie Hines and Alan Young in Mister Ed (1958)
  • Connie Hines and Edna Skinner in Mister Ed (1958)

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Cast & Crew

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Creators:

Sonia Chernus, Walter Brooks

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User Reviews


20 February 2009 | bkoganbing
7
| A Horse Of Course Of Course
One of the sillier, but yet most beloved of comedy/fantasy shows that were so prevalent in the Sixties was that show about a talking horse, the famous Mister Ed. The talking palomino had a popularity with real children and those elusive children of all ages because of the skill of Alan Young making you really believe that a horse could talk with the voice of Allan 'Rocky' Lane.

I'm sure for retired B picture cowboys who weren't getting too much work in the Sixties, Mister Ed must have provided a few nice paychecks for someone not in demand to be a cowboy hero any more. Lane's voice was well integrated into the personality of the palomino of whom evolution seems to have taken a quantum leap.

The premise of the show was that Mister Ed would only talk directly to Alan Young as Wilbur Post, architect who set up his studio in the barn on his property so he could spend as much time as he could with his talking equine. I well remember in the pilot episode when Young acquired Mister Ed, the horse told him that he never felt like talking to anyone until he met Young whom he felt had a real love of animals. It was the love that came through every week.

Young was married to Connie Hines who for five years couldn't figure out what this thing between Mister Ed and her husband was. Neither could anyone else and that led to the plot of most of the episodes.

I have very fond memories of the show in my younger days. It was one of those shows that was in a totally make believe world. No politics or issues of social significance ever intruded on the world of Wilbur Post and Mister Ed. It was and is completely timeless, you could remake all the episodes today without too much trouble.

In fact Mister Ed's primary source of mischief was the telephone extension in the studio/barn where he could call out anonymously to the world. When that receiver was picked up you knew Alan Young was in for 30 minutes of trouble. Can you imagine today what Mister Ed could do with a personal computer? The mind boggles.

Though I can never see anyone ever with the gentle humorous style of Alan Young doing Wilbur Post today, I could be surprised. I'm willing to be.

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