Sword of the Conqueror (1961)

Not Rated   |    |  Adventure, History, War


Sword of the Conqueror (1961) Poster

A cruel Lombard ruler marries the daughter of another king, kills her father, beats her lover but he ultimately faces a major popular revolt against him.


5.6/10
142

Photos

  • Sword of the Conqueror (1961)
  • Sword of the Conqueror (1961)
  • Guy Madison in Sword of the Conqueror (1961)
  • Eleonora Rossi Drago in Sword of the Conqueror (1961)
  • Guy Madison and Eleonora Rossi Drago in Sword of the Conqueror (1961)
  • Eleonora Rossi Drago in Sword of the Conqueror (1961)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


5 April 2011 | Bunuel1976
6
| SWORD OF THE CONQUEROR (Carlo Campogalliani, 1961) **1/2
This is definitely superior to the dullish REVAK THE REBEL (1960) but a slightly lesser achievement than THE MONGOLS (1961); both these also star Jack Palance and were made in quick succession. A couple of years ago, a work colleague of mine (a movie-buff who worked as an extra on renowned Malta-shot productions like CLASH OF THE TITANS {1981} and MUNICH {2005}) used to wax lyrically about his VHS of this ultra-rare film being among his most treasured possessions; at the time, I was not even aware of its existence and though I soon learned about Leonard Maltin's unflattering *1/2 rating, I immediately acquired the film when the first opportunity arose (sourced from a gorgeous, high-definition TV print that, nevertheless, suffers from a couple of very minor video glitches)! Still, the fact that its director's resume' (albeit having been active since 1914…and he amazingly made this, his penultimate effort, at 76 years of age!) was pretty unenviable, I went into it with low expectations only to be pleasantly surprised by the results; for the record, I had earlier acquired Campogalliani's swan-song, the even more obscure THE AVENGER OF VENICE (1964), and which I may be able to include in my ongoing Epic marathon.

Incidentally, the English title here has no particular relevance to the plot but, then, the original – ROSMUNDA E ALBOINO – does not exactly set the screen on fire either!; those two characters, of course, are the protagonists played by Eleanora Rossi-Drago and Palance respectively. In a neat reversal of the situation in REVAK THE REBEL, it is the latter who offers a truce to the conquered king (Andrea Bosic) – this time around by marrying the man's daughter, even if she already had an illegitimate child by his most loyal lieutenant (Guy Madison)! However, the ruler proves gullible and, led on by his scheming adviser, proceeds to place the blame of their defeat on Madison; the situation deteriorates further when the two allied nations organize a friendly joust. The very first participants are Madison and Palance's younger and war-mongering (both on and offscreen) brother and, when the latter turns up dead regardless, the conqueror reiterates by beheading the king himself (in full view of his own daughter)! Feeling completely ostracized now, Madison has no choice but to flee and try to rally support for his people's cause.

Naturally, the doubly begrudged and strong-willed princess initially resists Palance's advances but eventually relents when he gets wind of her offspring's existence (once again, by way of treachery); their relationship is sort of poignant since they gradually come to at least respect one another but, given the characteristically superficial script, this element is largely lost amid the myriad court intrigues and rampant snarling! Anyway, Madison comes upon a peaceful tribe who, in order to join forces with our hero, set him the odd task of going from one side of a valley to the other via a spiked rope laid over an array of wooden stakes! In the end, Madison bursts on the scene just as Palance finally forces himself upon Rossi-Drago: the two men engage in a scuffle and, as their common enemy seems to be getting the upper hand, the woman intervenes to give him the coup-de-grace – which, this being Palance, he turns into a melodramatic showcase; the closing shot, then, presents a conventional greeting of the reunited lovers by an anonymous but over-enthusiastic crowd.

Critic Reviews


More Like This

Revak the Rebel

Revak the Rebel

The Mongols

The Mongols

Sign of the Pagan

Sign of the Pagan

Barabbas

Barabbas

The Trojan Horse

The Trojan Horse

Goliath and the Barbarians

Goliath and the Barbarians

The Beast of Hollow Mountain

The Beast of Hollow Mountain

Duel of the Titans

Duel of the Titans

The Giant of Marathon

The Giant of Marathon

The Slave

The Slave

Night Train to Milan

Night Train to Milan

The Minotaur, the Wild Beast of Crete

The Minotaur, the Wild Beast of Crete

Did You Know?

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Adventure | History | War

Details

Release Date:

September 1962

Language

Italian


Country of Origin

Italy

Filming Locations

Italy

What to Stream for Black History Month

IMDb takes a look at 5 inspiring documentaries to stream this Black History Month.

Watch now

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com