Waltz of the Toreadors (1962)

Not Rated   |    |  Comedy


Waltz of the Toreadors (1962) Poster

This is the end of a glorious military career: General Leo Fitzjohn retires to his Sussex manor where he will write his memoirs. Unfortunately, his private life is a disaster: a confirmed ... See full summary »

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

5.8/10
576

Photos

  • Peter Sellers and Dany Robin in Waltz of the Toreadors (1962)
  • Dany Robin in Waltz of the Toreadors (1962)
  • Dany Robin in Waltz of the Toreadors (1962)
  • John Fraser and Dany Robin in Waltz of the Toreadors (1962)
  • Peter Sellers and Dany Robin in Waltz of the Toreadors (1962)
  • Dany Robin in Waltz of the Toreadors (1962)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


25 April 2002 | rsoonsa
10
| Sufficient wit at the expense of imagination.
Based quite loosely upon a play of the same name by Jean Anouilh, this film has been designed not merely as a showcase for the oversize comedic talent of Peter Sellers, but also, due to excessive producer interference, as a sex farce where character predominates over language, after the manner of a well-wrought and linear work of theatre. A droll script by Wolf Mankowitz transposes the action from post World War II France to early 20th century Sussex, arranging the characters in the story-propelled manner of the playwright, whose intensive exploration of the spirit becomes increasingly prominent as the work runs its course, greatly assisted by sensitive performances from Sellers, as the libidinous General Leo Fitzjohn, and by Margaret Leighton as Emily, his suffering wife. The plot spirals about the freshly retired General Fitzjohn and his longwhile Gallic inamorata, Ghislaine (Dany Robin) who have, as seen in a series of flashbacks, never been able to complete their love, but who are apparently finally going to be able to do so; that is, if a series of latter-day obstacles might be overcome. The picture is directed smoothly by John Guillermin, and there are excellent performances from Cyril Cusack as Dr. Grogan, the General's best friend, and John Fraser as a naive subaltern assigned to Fitzjohn, while a magnificent score is contributed by Richard Addinsell, one of his best for the screen, notable for its unreserved use of a minor key to accompany romantic and comic events. Unlike his Absurdist contemporaries, Anouilh never abandoned a sense of existential despair throughout his dramas, and this production succeeds in creating tension between Fitzjohn's sense of loss of place and his ability to forge forward after his natural urges, as evidenced by the delicious ending.

Critic Reviews


Thomas Middleditch Takes Us Inside 'Godzilla'

The "Silicon Valley" star moves from comedy to monsters with his role in Godzilla: King of the Monsters and gives insight into what it's really like on a big-budget movie set.

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

See what movies and TV series IMDb editors are excited about this month and check out our guide to superheroes, horror movies, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com