Doctor Who (1963–1989)

TV Series   |  TV-PG   |    |  Adventure, Drama, Family


Episode Guide
Doctor Who (1963) Poster

The adventures in time and space of the Doctor, a Time Lord who changes appearance and personality by regenerating when near death, and is joined by companions in battles against aliens and other megalomaniacs.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

8.4/10
32,455

Videos


Photos

  • 1965: William Hartnell (1908 - 1975), the first incarnation of TV's Dr Who, feels the hairless pates of two ticklish co-stars. They are appearing as the Teknix, bald mutated humans employed in Space Security.
  • 1965: Mr D Atkins and Mr B Jones of Shawcroft Models Ltd of Uxbridge, work on the head of a 'Zarbi', a monster that will be used for the BBC drama 'Dr Who'.
  • Stage hands seen carrying 'Daleks' on the set of the television programme 'Dr Who Meets Frankenstein'.
  • Doctor Who (1963)
  • Ronald Leigh-Hunt and Philip Ray in Doctor Who (1963)
  • Doctor Who (1963)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Cast & Crew

Top Series Cast



Creator:

Sydney Newman

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


10 May 2002 | dr_foreman
10
| a lifetime's worth of entertainment...
Doctor Who ran for 26 years, and its last episode was as fresh and imaginative as its first.

The show chronicles the adventures of a time-and-space traveling alien who wanders the universe battling evil conquerors, ruthless corporations, and other exploiters of the innocent and oppressed. Every few weeks, the Doctor would travel to a different planet or time, allowing the show's cast, setting, and tone to constantly change. Even the Doctor himself was periodically replaced by a new actor, "regenerating" his body whenever he was on the verge of death. This format gave the show an amazing freshness and allowed it to last for over a quarter of a century without becoming stale.

Since the show's cancellation, Doctor Who has been sustained by hundreds of books and radio shows. Although the concept is beginning to seem a bit old now, great "Who" stories are still coming out all the time.

Television remains the ultimate format for Doctor Who, however, and the series has something to offer for just about everyone. The early episodes, starring William Hartnell, were mysterious and realistic in tone, and are terribly underrated by the show's fans. Tom Baker, the most popular Doctor internationally, had a succession of wild and colorful adventures that are more entertaining and a lot funnier than most of the sitcoms on TV today. In its dying days, when Sylvester McCoy was in the lead role, Doctor Who became highly allegorical and politically charged.

Every Doctor's era has some merit, though some are obviously more inspired than others. In the early 70s and early 80s in particular, the show suffered from some poor production values and repetitive plots, but even the bad episodes are fun to watch and often redeemed by some strength – good performances, an interesting plot twist, etc.

Lovers of modern, flashy science fiction will probably laugh Doctor Who off the screen because of its modest special effects, but nevertheless it remains one of the most visually inventive TV shows ever made. Episodes like Tomb of the Cybermen and Remembrance of the Daleks contain unforgettable images that stack up to anything Hollywood produced on a 100x bigger budget. If you want to pick the show's visuals apart, you can, but you'll be doing yourself a disservice if you don't suspend your disbelief and allow yourself to be drawn into the Doctor's universe.

I may be in the minority, but I enjoyed the 1996 TV Movie that attempted to resurrect Doctor Who years after its cancellation. I don't buy the argument that Doctor Who couldn't survive in today's big-budget entertainment arena. The intelligence of the X-Men and Spider-Man movies has convinced me that a slick, cerebral version of Doctor Who could be produced today that would be faithful to the not-so-slick, cerebral original. But regardless of whether Doctor Who returns or not, it remains one of the great TV shows of all time. It still wins awards even today, and enjoys widespread popular and critical acclaim. Even Doctor Who's detractors only serve to prove that the show is famous enough to draw criticism!

In short, Doctor Who is smart, fun, and endlessly creative. It has kept me entertained for over fifteen years, and my enthusiasm for it has barely waned. Science fiction is in a dumb rut right now, so you could do a lot worse than look back at this show, one of the genre's crowning achievements.

Critic Reviews



Did You Know?

Trivia

In the serial Doctor Who: The Deadly Assassin: Part One (1976), it was established that the Doctor and the Time Lords have only 12 regenerations. However, it was also established in the 20th anniversary special, Doctor Who: The Five Doctors (1983), that the High Council of Time Lords can offer a new life cycle of regenerations. (In the 50th anniversary special, Matt Smith's Doctor was "gifted" an unspecified amount of regeneration "energy", and therefore an unknown number, as of late 2018, of further regenerations in the new cycle, starting with Peter Capaldi becoming Jodie Whitaker's Doctor regeneration).


Quotes

The Master: You are indeed a worthy opponent, Doctor. It's what gives your destruction its... piquancy.


Crazy Credits

The tradition of showing The Doctor's face in the opening titles was not introduced until Patrick Troughton's tenure with the program was under way. During Jon Pertwee's era, the producers experimented with changing the opening credits and music. One of the rejected opening credits was accidentally included on some prints of the story "Carnival of Monsters" that were broadcast overseas.


Alternate Versions

The first episode of Doctor Who to air in the UK was in fact the second episode ever made. Like Star Trek, a first pilot was filmed but never shown. This version is fairly similar to the aired version, but contains a number of subtle differences. In particular, a different version of the theme tune is used, and the Doctor comes across as more of an anti-hero in this version.

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Adventure | Drama | Family | Sci-Fi

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to superheroes, horror movies, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com