Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

PG   |    |  Comedy


Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) Poster

An insane general triggers a path to nuclear holocaust that a War Room full of politicians and generals frantically tries to stop.

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  • Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)
  • Stanley Kubrick directing "Dr. Strangelove," Columbia 1963.
  • Tracy Reed in Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)
  • Stanley Kubrick and Peter Sellers in Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)
  • George C. Scott in Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)
  • Peter Sellers in Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

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17 May 2017 | francozeff
10
| Russians In The War Room
Spectacular and chilling to watch Dr. Strangelove in May 16, 2017. I'm not going to talk about prophecy not even coincidence. Art has a way to warn, express or simply entertain in a way that its relevance will always be renewed. That opening with George C Scott's secretary, in her underwear, answering the phone for her boss in the most professional tone imaginable, is a masterful way to introduce us to the normal absurdity we're about to embark on. Terry Southern's extraordinary script (sharing credit with Peter George and Stanley Kubrick himself) is a masterpiece of intention and execution. The film doesn't have a moment of emptiness nor a single cheap shot. Everything works with the irrational logic of tradition and set standards. How can something so serious and ultimately terrifying can be so funny. I think that's the definition of film art. I don't want to sound pompous but that's exactly how I feel. I've seen a 1966 movie by Stanley Kubrick in 2017 that's better, more relevant, ingenious and even revolutionary than anything we've seen in a long, long time. Peter Sellers, fantastic three times over (and he was also going to play the Slim Pickens part) George C Scott in one of the greatest comic performances ever put on film and Sterling Hayden in a frighteningly credible show of abuse of power, complete the pleasures of this remarkable film.

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