Tom Jones (1963)

Not Rated   |    |  Adventure, Comedy, History


Tom Jones (1963) Poster

The romantic and chivalrous adventures of adopted bastard Tom Jones in 18th century England.

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6.6/10
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  • Albert Finney in Tom Jones (1963)
  • Albert Finney in Tom Jones (1963)
  • Albert Finney and Diane Cilento in Tom Jones (1963)
  • Albert Finney and Diane Cilento in Tom Jones (1963)
  • Albert Finney in Tom Jones (1963)
  • Diane Cilento in Tom Jones (1963)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


8 July 2000 | dragon-90
Stand and Deliver!
A fun and fresh screen adaption of British writer Henry Fielding's 18th Century novel of the same name, made at the threshold of the swinging (19)Sixties. Like the original story's French counterpart (Les Liaisons Dangereuses=Dangerous Liaisons), at its heart is a mannered metropolitan love triangle.

But before we arrive in the heart of London the stage is set amidst the lush green English countryside in Summer. Here we first meet the protagonist, Tom Jones, played by Albert Finney in his most youthful bloom, and his extended family representing every facet of post-Glorious Revolution England.

An incorrigible ne'er-do-well, Tom's genuine love for his neighbor Squire Alworthy's daughter Sophie (a very lovely Susannah York), takes him to the heart of fashionable London society in a series of comedic wrong-turns and misunderstandings. Here he becomes embroiled in the games of the jaded aristocrat Lady Bellaston played by Joan Greenwood. Greenwood steals the show as the original Mrs. Robinson and, through her machinations, Tom is led to the gallows. But at the last minute...

Throughout the movie is paced with a modern sense of realism, made effective by hand-held camera sequences and the quick editing of Antony Gibbs. Old-fashioned film techniques are used effectively with eye-to-the-camera realism, and convey an up-to-date feel. There are moments of beauty as well as comedy in this very satisfying entertainment. The cast is stellar with many familiar names--Hugh Griffith, Rachel Kempson, David Warner (in his first movie), the settings realistic, and the the musical score a perfect fit. A great time overall!

An interesting note, supposedly this is the last movie seen by John F. Kennedy (in a White House screening) before he was assassinated.

Critic Reviews



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Did You Know?

Trivia

Wilfrid Lawson and Hugh Griffith were drinking buddies and inveterate troublemakers. During location shooting in the seaside resort of Weymouth, they dangled a barmaid outside a window upside down.


Quotes

Narrator: In the west of England there was once a Squire Allworthy. After several months in London he returns home.


Goofs

After Lady Bellaston reads Tom's letter proposing marriage, she wads it into a small ball, clearly wrinkling it. In the next scene, Lady Bellaston shows the letter to Sophie's aunt, but now it is smooth and uncrumpled.


Crazy Credits

Opening credits: In the west of England there was once a Squire Allworthy. After several months in London he returned home. his sister, Bridget. his servants. after supper. "Mrs. Wilkins!" "aaah!" a baby! abandoned!!! "how did it get here?" "who can the mother be?" "Jenny Jones!" "who is the father Jenny?" "send for Partridge the barber!" Partridge the barber - the father? "I will deal with you later, sir!" "you must be sent away from this shame and degradation." "as for your child . . . . . " "I will bring him up as if he were my own son." "what will you call him brother?" "Tom Jones." of whom the opinion of all was that he was born to be hanged.



Alternate Versions

When the film was first submitted to the BBFC, director John Trevelyan suggested to Tony Richardson that the film would pass as an 'A' (under 16's accompanied) if he removed a shot of Mrs Waters cradling an oyster on her tongue before swallowing it during the famous eating sequence. Richardson refused and the film was passed as an 'X' (no over-16's allowed). All UK releases since then have been cut by 12 secs to remove shots from a cockfight scene, which is regarded as cruel animal activity by the BBFC.


Soundtracks

Sarabande
(uncredited)
Music by
George Frideric Handel
Arranged by Douglas Gamley

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Adventure | Comedy | History

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