How to Murder Your Wife (1965)

Approved   |    |  Comedy


How to Murder Your Wife (1965) Poster

A dedicated bachelor drunkenly marries a young woman and immediately lives to regret it.


6.6/10
5,658


Videos


Photos

  • Jack Lemmon and Virna Lisi in How to Murder Your Wife (1965)
  • Jack Lemmon and Virna Lisi in How to Murder Your Wife (1965)
  • Jack Lemmon and Virna Lisi in How to Murder Your Wife (1965)
  • Jack Lemmon and Virna Lisi in How to Murder Your Wife (1965)
  • Jack Lemmon and Virna Lisi in How to Murder Your Wife (1965)
  • Jack Lemmon and Virna Lisi in How to Murder Your Wife (1965)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Cast & Crew

Top Billed Cast



Director:

Richard Quine

Writer:

George Axelrod

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


25 August 2009 | federovsky
Cartoon realism
The comic style of this film is reflected in Jack Lemmon's cartoons; in fact, he creates his comic-strip character, Brash Brannigan, in his own likeness and then tries to influence his own life by changing Brash's. A brilliant narrative trick.

The last time I saw this, adult life lay ahead like a kind of exam. Orange juice in the shower, and beautiful blonds popping out of cakes seemed to be the goal. This film was like a comedic case study in lifestyle management, a blueprint to be stored away - just in case. I liked all the ideas here: the perfect bachelor life, waking up and finding yourself married, the club where you can't be reached - and it's still likable.

Lemmon shows terrific timing with his rapid use of language and gesture that has an amazing flexibility to it - as a technique that is surely unique to him. Terry-Thomas is splendid and quite solid in contrast. Of course we scoff at the idea of a cartoonist living in a townhouse in the middle of Manhatten with a butler, but that's a metaphor for the end of the old days.

The Brash Brannigan shenanigans at the beginning were a little overdone though, and the courtroom scene near the end is more than preposterous - it's post-posterous; the whole murder trial device is weakened by the fact that we know what actually happened - much better if there'd been some doubt in our minds also as to whether he had killed his wife - hard to understand how George Axelrod's script missed that obvious point.

Still, the humour tootles along nicely: the gloppita-gloppita machine; the goofballs that make your wife dance on the table - Brrrrrrrrrrp! - and then collapse - Blapppp!; delicious Virna Lisi; and those in-your-dreams lifestyle tips - it's like re-reading an old favourite comic strip.

Critic Reviews



Box Office

Gross USA:

$12,467,420

Contribute to this page

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com