Marnie (1964)

PG   |    |  Crime, Drama, Mystery


Marnie (1964) Poster

Mark marries Marnie although she is a habitual thief and has serious psychological problems, and tries to help her confront and resolve them.


7.2/10
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  • "Marnie" 1964 Universal
  • Alfred Hitchcock and Tippi Hedren in Marnie (1964)
  • "Marnie," Tippi Hedren with Director Alfred Hitchcock. 1964 Universal
  • Alfred Hitchcock and Sean Connery in Marnie (1964)
  • Alfred Hitchcock on the set of "Marnie," 1964.
  • Alfred Hitchcock and Tippi Hedren in Marnie (1964)

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13 July 2001 | TexMetal4JC
8
| Yet another underrated Hitchcock
The rumors surrounding Marnie - the last in an amazing run of truly great Hitchcock movies that lasted from 1950-1964 - are plentiful. All of them consist of director Alfred Hitchcock's growing obsession for Tippi Hedrin (who starred in The Birds one year earlier). By the end of the movie, Hitchcock would not talk to Hedrin or even refer to her by name (this following a supposed failed pass at Hedrin), and his friends say Marnie was the last movie Hitchcock truly cared about.

Regardless of the rumors, Marnie was a box-office failure and went unnoticed until recently when DVD brought back Hitchcock's unremarkable films, along with his classics. And behold, from the ashes ariseth... Marnie.

Starring Hedrin as Marnie and Sean Connery as the man who falls in love with her, this movie tells of a compulsive thief and pathalogical liar who is caught by Connery and blackmailed into marrying him. Connery finds that Hedrin has incredible fears of red and thunderstorms, refuses to let men touch her and has disturbing dreams brought on by knocks at her door. Connery must play the dual role of keeping Marnie away from the police while trying to find out why she does what she does.

This is indeed an excellent Hitchcock film. He reminds the audience that he did start out directing silent movies, and uses this silence very well in the robbery/cleaning lady scene. The moments leading up to Marnie's revealing flashback are incredible, and the movie reeks of typical Hitchcock: slow, methodic pacing to a brilliant and stunning climax.

Marnie is not a patented "Hitchcock classic": The fades-to-red have not aged well (if they ever did look good), the horse-riding scenes just don't work, and the backgrounds are obviously fake (although it has been speculated that Hitchcock did this on purpose -- whatever the case he later regretted it). But the basic premise, the acting, the directing are all top notch and have turned Marnie into another of the "Underrated Hitchcock"s.

8/10

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