Youngblood Hawke (1964)

Unrated   |    |  Drama


Youngblood Hawke (1964) Poster

Arthur Hawke works as a coal truck driver in Kentucky, he in the process trying to protect his widowed mother Sarah Hawke's property rights against his wealthy and cutthroat paternal uncles... See full summary »


6.2/10
298

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  • James Franciscus and Suzanne Pleshette in Youngblood Hawke (1964)
  • Geneviève Page in Youngblood Hawke (1964)
  • James Franciscus and Suzanne Pleshette in Youngblood Hawke (1964)
  • Suzanne Pleshette in Youngblood Hawke (1964)
  • James Franciscus and Geneviève Page in Youngblood Hawke (1964)
  • James Franciscus and Suzanne Pleshette in Youngblood Hawke (1964)

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21 May 2002 | reelguy2
10
| The last of Delmer Daves' potboiler masterpieces
James Franciscus had the role of his career (yes, even greater than Beneath the Planet of the Apes!) as a Kentucky truck driver who comes to New York City to make it as a novelist. I'm not being facetious about Franciscus: he never looked more handsome, and he plays his role with a disarming blend of cockiness and vulnerability. He has perhaps the most soulful and expressive eyes of any blond-haired actor in the movies.

Suzanne Pleshette plays his patient editor with her usual warmth and intelligence, and Genevieve Page is elegant and fascinating as the society woman who "keeps" him. Edward Andrews is witty and menacing as a literary critic, and Mary Astor is totally believable as a veteran stage actress. Everybody shines in the all-star cast.

Delmer Daves took Herman Wouk's mammoth bestseller (what's new?) and wisely made some changes in his screen adaptation. In the novel, Youngblood Hawke is a brawny, average looking man where Daves gives us a beautiful, cerebral hero. Now for a glossy, unabashed soap opera, eye candy can sure help 137 minutes pass a little more pleasantly! Another of Daves' departures from the novel is in permitting more of the leads to remain alive by the end; by doing this, Daves is giving us our cake and letting us eat it. Frankly, I *devour* it on average of once a month!

This film was the last of Delmer Daves' potboiler masterpieces - an enormously entertaining blend of class and trash.

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