The New York Times reported in its review of the film that writer William Inge requested his name be removed from the credits due to changes made by the films producer to "glorify Ann-Margret." The screenplay was credited to "Walter Gage" in the finished film. In a interview for "Films and Filming," from January 1976, Ann-Margret explained the real story: "You should have seen the film we originally shot. After the alterations were made William Inge had his name taken off of it. His screenplay had been wonderful. So brutally honest. And the woman Laurel, as he wrote her, was mean...and he made that very sad. But the studio at that time didn't want me to have that kind of an image for the young people of America. They thought it was too brutal a portrayal. It had been filmed entirely, using William Inge's script, but a year after it was completed they got another writer in, and another director. They wanted me to re-do five key scenes. And those scenes changed the story. That's when Inge took his name off. There were two of those scenes that I just refused to do. The other three...I did, but I was upset and angry. They'd altered the whole life of the story and made the character I played another person altogether. To put it mildly, they'd softened the blow that Inge had delivered. If only everyone could have seen that film the way he wrote it."

The house where Bus demonstrates a vacuum cleaner was previously seen as the Cleaver home on TV's Leave It To Beaver.

Brett Somers' movie debut.

Final film of Ethel Griffies.

The car Bus buys is a 1957 Plymouth Fury convertible.

The TWA Convair 880 seen in the film, tail number N820TW, was later destroyed during a pilot training exercise on 13 September 1965 at the Kansas City airport.

Laurel's car is a Jaguar XK-E (E-Type) Series 1 2-door roadster.