The Cincinnati Kid (1965)

TV-14   |    |  Drama


The Cincinnati Kid (1965) Poster

An up-and-coming poker player tries to prove himself in a high-stakes match against a long-time master of the game.


7.3/10
13,843

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  • Edward G. Robinson and Steve McQueen in The Cincinnati Kid (1965)
  • Joan Blondell in The Cincinnati Kid (1965)
  • Tuesday Weld in The Cincinnati Kid (1965)
  • Steve McQueen and Tuesday Weld in The Cincinnati Kid (1965)
  • Ann-Margret and Tuesday Weld in The Cincinnati Kid (1965)
  • Tuesday Weld on the set of "Cincinatti Kid" 1965

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User Reviews


13 April 2005 | The_Void
8
| A classic film about a great game
Steve McQueen's answer to Paul Newman's huge success with The Hustler isn't quite as good as the earlier classic; but it's still a damn fine movie. Poker is a fascinating game, and it therefore makes a great base for a film. The Cincinnati Kid capitalises on that fact and it draws all of it's excitement from the game at it's centre. The type of poker played in this movie is 5 card stud; and as a Texas Hold'Em fan, I was a little disappointed by this as stud simply isn't as good; but poker is poker, and 5 card stud is still an admirable base for a film. As implied, the film is at it's best when we're watching the action on the table; and it's easy to liken the structure of this movie to that of a disaster movie, in that it's central theme is the focus and the plot is then bulked out by human drama. The drama side of the story follows Eric Stoner (McQueen), a gambling man who's been honing his skills and working his way up to a game with 'The Man' (Edward G. Robinson). However, things are never that simple as when there's money involved; there's always someone willing to force it to go their way.

Steve McQueen makes a great leading man. His cocky swagger and charisma are always a delight to watch, but this combines with his off-screen personality, and when watching him I cant help but think about his big headedness when it comes to film billing and the like. However; he's not the star of this movie in my eyes, as it's Edward G. Robinson that takes that honour. Robinson is a fantastic actor, and one that rarely gets his dues when it comes to deciding the greatest actors of all time. Here, he adds great believability to his role as the top poker player and he ensures that the atmosphere around his player is one of confidence and authority. And that's how it should be - he is the man. The Cincinnati Kid is exciting throughout; but never more so than on the build up to it's conclusion. The ending is one of my favourite of all time, and Robinson's line shortly after the end stands up with the greatest lines ever written for cinema. While this film is no Hustler; it's still a damn good movie, and one that I hugely recommend. Especially if you're a poker player!

Critic Reviews



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Did You Know?

Trivia

Spencer Tracy was originally cast as Lancey Howard but poor health forced him to withdraw and he was replaced by Edward G. Robinson.


Quotes

Slade: Six stacks, is that right, Shooter?
Shooter: Six.
Slade: Well, we've been playing 30 hours... uh, that rate, six thousand, that makes roughly, uh, $200 an hour. Thank you for the entertainment, gentlemen. I am particularly grateful to Lancey, here; it's been a ...
Lancey Howard: ...


Goofs

When "Shooter" is dealing cards in the 5-card stud game rather than dealing the first card to the player to his left (Howard) it appears that he skips him and deals the first card to the player to his left. This is in fact normal practice for card tables to "rotate deal" so that every player gets a chance to be the first to bet. It is the job of the dealer to keep track of the positions, and that is why it is common to have a "dealer button" that passes to the left.


Alternate Versions

There are two different endings to this film. The first ending, which is shown in all vhs releases, after Stoner loses the coin throw to the shoe shine boy, the boy walks away saying "You're not ready for me yet, Kid." As the boy walks away, Stoner turns around and it fades into the ending credits. In the second (or extended) ending, which was shown on Turner Classic Movies, after Stoner loses the coin throw to the shoe shine boy, the boy leaves saying "You're not ready for me yet, kid." Stoner turns around and continues walking until he sees Christian, then embraces her. The frame then freezes and says "The End" before fading into the credits.


Soundtracks

I've Got You Under My Skin
(uncredited)
Written by
Cole Porter

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