The Tomb of Ligeia (1964)

Not Rated   |    |  Drama, Horror, Thriller


The Tomb of Ligeia (1964) Poster

A man's obsession with his dead wife drives a wedge between him and his new bride.

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6.6/10
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  • Elizabeth Shepherd in The Tomb of Ligeia (1964)
  • The Tomb of Ligeia (1964)
  • Elizabeth Shepherd in The Tomb of Ligeia (1964)
  • Vincent Price in The Tomb of Ligeia (1964)
  • Vincent Price in The Tomb of Ligeia (1964)
  • Penelope Lee in The Tomb of Ligeia (1964)

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30 December 2003 | capkronos
8
| Corman finally brings a Poe film outdoors.
Well, at least for a little while! His last of eight Poe films as director is (loosely) based on the Poe work of the same name and is a solid metaphorical ghost story. Lady Rowena (the wonderful Elizabeth Shepherd) falls in love with Verden Fell (Vincent Price) despite his strange behavior and questionable past. Soon after their marriage, he starts disappearing, she's menaced by that old Poe stand-by (the evil black cat) and plagued by horrific nightmares involving Verden's deceased former wife Ligeia (also played by Shepherd), whose ghost seems intent on ruining the union. Price, in top hat and strange sunglasses in many scenes (his vision being "dangerously acute"), seems a bit too old for the role, but still manages to come through with an effective performance. Corman has always been underrated for effectively capturing period detail on a limited budget and it's his keen eye for the crumbling ruins, lush green countrysides, oceanfronts and shadowy castle corridors that make much of this film work. Screenplay by future Oscar-winner Robert Towne (CHINATOWN). LIGEIA was Corman's last horror film as director until 1990's FRANKENSTEIN UNBOUND.

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