The Monkees (1966–1968)

TV Series   |  TV-G   |    |  Comedy, Music


Episode Guide
The Monkees (1966) Poster

The misadventures of a struggling rock band.


7.4/10
3,637


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  • Davy Jones in The Monkees (1966)
  • Peter Tork in The Monkees (1966)
  • "The Monkees" Michael Nesmith on the set, 1966
  • Peter Tork in The Monkees (1966)
  • Michael Nesmith in The Monkees (1966)
  • "The Monkees" Davy Jones on the set, 1966

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Cast & Crew

Top Series Cast



Creators:

Paul Mazursky, Larry Tucker

Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


8 March 2004 | KMM
TV Show That Never Gets Old
I have enjoyed watching this show for years since I first saw it in syndication on local television back in the late 1970s. From the first time I watched The Monkees I was hooked and have watched the show ever since. Whenever it would be shown over the years I was there to watch it, including the revival in popularity that arose in 1986 when MTV ran a Monkees marathon that exposed their antics to a new generation of fans. The show had a great zaniness that blended a unique mixture of music and comedy, which made the show a delight for me. As a kid I enjoyed the entertaining plots and thought it would be cool to hang around with these 4 guys. I did, though, always look forward to the musical numbers that occurred in each episode.

The music on the show was what really appealed to me and made me a fan in the beginning. Their albums from the 60s still make up part of my music collection. The show was never that popular when it was originally airing on commercial television, but the music really helped push the popularity of the band giving The Monkees a cult-like status similar to The Beatles at the time. I especially like the music of Michael Nesmith. The songs that appeared in the show by Nez were most appealing to me and this carried over to his solo career as well. Another thing that was a great part of the show was the comic timing of Mickey Dolenz. He always cracks me up with his wacky style of voices and improvisation. All four were talented in their own way, but Mickey Dolenz was the funniest to me.

It is still one of my all time favorite shows and has left a lasting impression on me that will stay with me my whole life. One of the more memorable shows was the parody of Faust called The Devil and Peter Tork. It had some seriousness, but that helped the comedy to play. Some episodes played out better than others with the second season being a little more reflective of the 60s culture that was growing popular during that period in America.

Was it a TV show? Was it a rock n' roll group? It was neither, and it was a little of both. Mickey Dolenz equated their becoming a group to Leonard Nimoy becoming a Vulcan. No matter what you believe, we can all agree that The Monkees, although brief in its original run, was about a group that did play, that did perform their own music and the way they did it left an impact on generations both young and old and will do so for years to come.

Critic Reviews


Did You Know?

Trivia

Peter Tork's untimely death in February 2019 was only 3 months after the release of the 2018 album the Christmas party.


Quotes

Micky: I can't stand to see a grown bush cry.


Goofs

In a number of second-season episodes, Micky Dolenz's hairstyle changes back and forth from a straight hairdo to a curly "permed" look. This was due to the fact that second-season episodes were filmed at two different times, the spring of 1967 (when a number of the actual episode storylines were filmed) and then later that fall (during which time all the song performances were filmed). During the summer break, Micky let his hair grow out. The difference is perhaps most notable in The Monkees: A Nice Place to Visit (1967), when at one moment Micky is performing a song with his hair curled, and is then seen leaving the stage with his hair straight.


Crazy Credits

The Monkees: The Christmas Show (1967) departs from the usual stills montage by ending with The Monkees giving the TV audience a Christmas wish of peace. The group then brings the crew-members on to the set and gives them all a very happy and raucous opportunity to give their loved ones at home a Christmas greeting, all while the closing credits play over this.


Alternate Versions

Various episodes when either shown in network reruns (i.e. the CBS run) or in syndication had newer songs replacing older ones on the soundtrack.


Soundtracks

The Kind of Girl I Could Love
Written and Produced by
Michael Nesmith
Performed by The Monkees

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Comedy | Music

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