Alice in Wonderland (1966)

TV Movie   |  Not Rated   |    |  Drama, Family, Fantasy


Alice in Wonderland (1966) Poster

A girl named Alice (Anne-Marie Mallik) falls down a rabbit-hole and wanders into the strange Wonderland.


7.1/10
673

Photos

  • Anne-Marie Mallik in Alice in Wonderland (1966)
  • Michael Gough in Alice in Wonderland (1966)
  • Michael Gough, Peter Cook, and Anne-Marie Mallik in Alice in Wonderland (1966)
  • Anne-Marie Mallik in Alice in Wonderland (1966)
  • Peter Sellers, Wilfrid Brambell, Alison Leggatt, and Anne-Marie Mallik in Alice in Wonderland (1966)
  • Michael Gough, Peter Cook, and Anne-Marie Mallik in Alice in Wonderland (1966)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


20 October 2013 | TheLittleSongbird
7
| The most unique of the Alice in Wonderland adaptations there is
Not the best, I personally have a preference for the 1933 film, the Disney film, the 1985 version(though it is uneven) and the 1983 theatre production. It is on par though with the 1999 and 1972 versions and is much better than Tim Burton's film and the Burbank Films Australia and Jetlag versions. This Alice in Wonderland is certainly fascinating and is the most unique adaptation of the book, though Anne-Marie Mallick's Alice was too detached and expressionless even for a character that was written in the film to be like that, the film drags in places and the Old Father William poem recitation made little sense truncated and felt pointless. The croquet match sequence is also on the strange side, though in a way it's meant to be. The black and white photography is beautiful though, and the costumes and sets are very charming and surrealistic. Ravi Shankar's music is very hypnotic and dream-like in quality, very ideal for the atmosphere. The story has a much more surreal and darker touch than most Alice in Wonderland adaptations, but it still entertains and the Mad Hatter tea party sequence is truly memorable. The highlight is the Gryphon and Mock Turtle scene, brilliantly done. Jonathan Miller directs with a wonderfully weird style with a touch of subtlety when needed. The dialogue is in keeping with the tone of the film yet doesn't completely ignore Lewis Carroll's writing either. The best line? Personal favourite is Peter Sellers' "they don't have verdicts like that anymore"(or something along the lines of that). The supporting turns are excellent, especially Peter Cook as the maddest Mad Hatter there has ever been- and in a good way-, while Wilfred Brambell's jittery White Rabbit, Michael Redgrave's aloof Caterpillar, Michael Gough's twitchy March Hare, Peter Sellers' hilarious if too brief King of Hearts and John Gielgud's touchingly melancholic Mock Turtle stand out too. To conclude, a good Alice in Wonderland adaptation and very uniquely done. 7/10 Bethany Cox

Critic Reviews


More Like This

Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

Alice Through the Looking Glass

Alice Through the Looking Glass

Alice Through the Looking Glass

Alice Through the Looking Glass

Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

Alice Through the Looking Glass

Alice Through the Looking Glass

Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Drama | Family | Fantasy

Erin Moriarty Reveals Her Acting Superheroes

Breakout star Erin Moriarty of "The Boys" shouts out her real-life super squad of actors.

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

Join us Sunday, Sept. 22, at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT for IMDb LIVE After the Emmys, with exclusive interviews, and more. Plus, see what IMDb editors are watching this month.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com