The Glass Bottom Boat (1966)

Approved   |    |  Comedy, Romance


The Glass Bottom Boat (1966) Poster

After a series of misunderstandings, the head of an aerospace research laboratory begins to suspect his new girlfriend is a Russian spy.

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6.5/10
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  • Doris Day and Arthur Godfrey in The Glass Bottom Boat (1966)
  • Doris Day in The Glass Bottom Boat (1966)
  • Doris Day in The Glass Bottom Boat (1966)
  • Paul Lynde and Rod Taylor in The Glass Bottom Boat (1966)
  • Doris Day and Alice Pearce in The Glass Bottom Boat (1966)
  • Doris Day and Rod Taylor in The Glass Bottom Boat (1966)

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14 August 2005 | blanche-2
6
| frothy '60s comedy
What a warm, wonderful actress Doris Day is, what a knockout, what a screen presence. And just think, at the age of 42 (ancient by Hollywood standards in 1966) she was playing a desirable woman lusted after by several men. Glass Bottom Boat is a very '60s comedy in look and subject matter - the space age and spies. Taylor has invented a gizmo and when there's a leak from his project team, suspicion falls on Day, who works for the company and calls someone named Vladimir several times a day. Vladimir, however, is her dog, and she's calling him so he'll run around while the phone is ringing and get some exercise.

The film is loaded with space-age gadgets. Taylor's computerized, motorized kitchen is great, complete with a floor-cleaning robot - wonder if the inventors of today's robot vacuum saw this movie. He also pilots his boat via a remote - but as he points out during a scene where the boat runs amok with Day inside, that needs further work.

There's lots of slapstick and comedy support from Dom Deluise, Dick Martin, and Paul Lynde. Lynde, by the way, looked great in drag, and has some great delivery in his scenes. Some of the scenes, especially those of Deluise, had an improv feel. The late Eric Fleming, Clint Eastwood's boss on "Rawhide," plays a CIA man. This was his last film; he drowned shortly afterwards. Rod Taylor, who, by the way, is younger than Doris Day, is effective as Day's romantic interest. Of note, radio personality Arthur Godfrey plays Day's father. There's also an appearance by Robert Vaughan as an homage to his "Man from UNCLE" character.

Frothy fun, and Doris Day is always a delight.

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