A Man for All Seasons (1966)

G   |    |  Biography, Drama, History


A Man for All Seasons (1966) Poster

The story of Thomas More, who stood up to King Henry VIII when the King rejected the Roman Catholic Church to obtain a divorce and remarry.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

7.8/10
27,744

Videos


Photos

  • Paul Scofield and Susannah York in A Man for All Seasons (1966)
  • Paul Scofield and Nigel Davenport in A Man for All Seasons (1966)
  • Robert Shaw in A Man for All Seasons (1966)
  • Fred Zinnemann and Paul Scofield in A Man for All Seasons (1966)
  • Nigel Davenport in A Man for All Seasons (1966)
  • Paul Scofield and Susannah York in A Man for All Seasons (1966)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


4 March 2004 | tomreynolds2004
10
| The Ultimate Lead Performance
Paul Scofield's rendition of Sir Thomas More as written by Robert Bolt and directed by Fred Zinneman is the greatest lead dramatic performance EVER in cinematic history. He is that magnificent. He IS Sir Thomas More. We feel his hope, weariness, fire, virtue, protectiveness, morality, and bemusement as richly as he conveys each one frequently, one right after another. He was made for Bolt's dialogue, and Bolt's dialogue is drilled forever into our conscious by Scofield's flawless performance.

Everything else is also here. Leo McKern is brilliant as politically motivated prosecutor, Lord Cromwell. A bit subtler, but no less brilliant is Nigel Davenport as a man of some conscience, but not quite enough. John Hurt is unforgettable as ambitious young Rich led into temptation by Lord Cromwell. The incomparable Dame Wendy Hiller -- who passed just last year -- adds several more dimensions than her rather sparsely written role as Scofield's wife should have allowed for. Every minute she is on the screen is magnificent. Susannah York walks a tightrope between being scholarly reason and her passion for what is right. Robert Shaw as Henry VIII and Orson Wells as Cardinal Woolsey are larger than life and completely compelling during their all-too-brief virtuoso solos. The cinematography is lush. The soundtrack is historically accurate and perfectly positioned. Key sounds punctuate three pregnant pauses with explosive impact. The movie is technically as perfect as an historical epic can be. The film is simply exquisite.

All that being said, as I reflect momentarily in my head on closing this, it is Scofield's incomparable and breathtaking performance which still leaves me in complete awe.

Critic Reviews



The Shows Everyone Will Be Talking About This Week

Get ahead of the buzz with these must-watch shows: A dark sci-fi prequel, huge performances at the Oscars, and a star-studded new season of mockumentaries. Presented by M&M's.

Watch our video

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to the Academy Awards, our coverage of the 2019 awards season, and more.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com