The Flying Nun (1967–1970)

TV Series   |  TV-G   |    |  Comedy


Episode Guide
The Flying Nun (1967) Poster

The misadventures of a nun who can fly and her convent and neighbours.


6.4/10
2,013

Videos


Photos

  • The Flying Nun (1967)
  • Sally Field in The Flying Nun (1967)
  • Sally Field and Madeleine Sherwood in The Flying Nun (1967)
  • Sally Field in The Flying Nun (1967)
  • Michael Pataki and Alejandro Rey in The Flying Nun (1967)
  • Sally Field in The Flying Nun (1967)

See all photos

Get More From IMDb

For an enhanced browsing experience, get the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Cast & Crew

Top Series Cast



Creators:

Bernard Slade, Harry Ackerman, Max Wylie

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


13 August 2002 | leex1214
A series for the heart and soul
This show is quite simply an inspiration for the soul. It is always morally uplifting (forgive the pun, it was not intentional) to watch Sally Field as Sister Bertrille, the spunky, spirited, warm hearted nun who just happens to be able to fly, because of her light weight and because of the aerodynamics of the cornette that she wears. Of course, this is not in any way realistic; how could a little cornette generate over 90 lbs. of lift except in gale force winds? However, this is not what matters; in fact I think it only adds to the magic of the show. The point of the series is to show what humans are like at their best; Sister Bertrille is so upbeat that everyone is cheerfull when she is present (that is, except for Carlos when she wants him to do something for the convent, but even he gets over it). As I said above, Sally Field was perfect as Sister Bertrille (I wonder what it was like for her to constantly be a character who, for all intents and purposes, did not have much of a social life), but the central supporting actors were excellent as well. I feel that Alejandro Rey deserves special mention for his performance of Carlos Ramirez, the suave playboy who gets nervous whenever Sister Bertrille is even in the same room. In the first season, the guest stars were also excellent; for example, there was the well respected Celia Lovsky, who in Science Fiction circles is famous for her performance of T'Pau, in the classis episode "Amok Time" of Star Trek, and there was also Elinor Donahue, who among other things played Elie Walker in the first season of the Andy Griffith Show. Unfortunately, in later episodes, the guest stars were not of this high quality: it seems to me as if most of them overdid their parts, making them unrealistic and somewhat icky sweet. Despite this, The Flying Nun is a show that one can always get enjoyment and inspiration out of, if one watches it in the proper frame of mind. Unfortunately, nowadays most people with their pessimistic, jaded outlook on the world are unable to appreciate the magic of this show. Perhaps this is why TV Guide placed this series in their list of 50 worst shows of all time (when I saw Flying Nun and Hogan's Heroes on that list, I thought to myself, WHAT???, but now that I realise why they did that, I can only lament on the state that this world has come to). If only TV Land placed this wonderful show at a more accessible time, rather than the late night slot that they have it on now ! (I have heard that TV Land is going to take this show off the air as of September. I can only pray that this will not be the case.)

Critic Reviews


The Best TV and Movies to Watch in August

Check out our editors' picks for a breakdown of the movies and shows we're excited about this month, including "Lovecraft Country," coming soon to HBO.

See our picks list

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com