Bonnie and Clyde (1967)

R   |    |  Action, Biography, Crime


Bonnie and Clyde (1967) Poster

Bonnie Parker, a bored waitress falls in love with an ex-con named Clyde Barrow and together they start a violent crime spree through the country, stealing cars and robbing banks.

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7.9/10
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  • Warren Beatty at an event for Bonnie and Clyde (1967)
  • Warren Beatty in Bonnie and Clyde (1967)
  • Warren Beatty at an event for Bonnie and Clyde (1967)
  • Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway in Bonnie and Clyde (1967)
  • Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway in Bonnie and Clyde (1967)
  • Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway in Bonnie and Clyde (1967)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


22 April 1999 | Hermit C-2
10
| (Top 10 choice) Superb job done by all involved.
Besides being an enormously entertaining movie, "Bonnie and Clyde" was an important 1960's landmark film in a couple of ways. Its violent ending helped to hasten the end of the old Hayes code, which had been a severe restrictor of artistic freedom; and it helped shape the '60's image of the anti-hero. For these things it received a good deal of condemnation as well as commendation.

The picture is a melange of artistic license and historical accuracy. The recreation of the Depression-era look is superb. (It's done in an unostentatious manner, however. One feels it rather than particularly noting it.) While some liberties are taken with the story, a reasonable amount jibes with the facts. But certainly there is some romanticization here. And of course the real Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker were not nearly as attractive as Beatty and Dunaway.

The acting by the two principals is top-notch, as well as that of most of the rest of the cast, especially Gene Hackman (the first film I ever saw him in) and Estelle Parsons.It's not generally recognized that actors Denver Pyle, Dub Taylor and Gene Wilder contribute to the movie's success. Technically as well as artistically everyone from director Arthur Penn on down deserves praise for making what I think is one of the finest movies ever made, without qualification. It seems we all reserve the warmest spots in our hearts for favorite films of our youth. This is one of mine.

And you'll love Flatt & Scruggs' "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" too.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Bonnie Parker was 4'10" tall, nine inches shorter than Faye Dunaway.


Quotes

Clyde Barrow: I don't think he's lost. I think the bank's been offerin' extra reward money for us. I think Frank just figured on some easy pickins, didn't ya Frank? You're no Texas Ranger. You're hardly doin' your job. You ought to be home protectin' the rights ...


Goofs

About 50 minutes into the film Bonnie tells Clyde to pull the car over. Clyde drives into a field and they both get out, walk a way behind the car and start squabbling about getting rid of Buck's wife. Bonnie's hair is messed up and a few strands are draped back to front and more hair is hanging down the middle of her face. Scene cuts to Clyde momentarily then right back to Bonnie - with her hair out of her face and the back to front strands are gone.


Alternate Versions

Several scenes (most of which can be read in the film's script) were shot but removed or altered for various reasons, either for content or to keep the running time under two hours. These scenes are, in chronological order:

  • The earliest versions had Clyde shooting and killing the butcher during their fight. This was toned down to Clyde just shooting the butcher, and finally just pistol whipping him. In real life, speculation still exists as to whether Clyde Barrow actually committed the crime this is based on; although his photo was picked out, the method in which it was executed doesn't fit his MO. In the final cut, there is a brief jump in the film during the fight, where it was spliced from the original, more graphic conclusion.
  • After picking up C.W., Clyde and Bonnie take him to a diner where they plan their next robbery.
  • After Clyde kills Doyle Johnson (the man on the running board), Bonnie talks with CW in the bathroom while Clyde cleans his guns and laments his actions. In the bathroom CW bathes and Bonnie attempts to seduce him, but changes her mind when CW proves to be less than romantic material. A still from this scene-- Bonnie wearing a slip and Clyde's hat-- can be seen on the DVD.
  • A longer scene of Buck and Blanche's approach to the motor lodge. Buck is singing Bible hymns and Blanche scolds him for bringing her to see Clyde.
  • A longer version of Bonnie's visit home; she sits in the car and her sister gives her a perm (a portion of this-- Bonnie on the running board getting her hair put up-- exists in the final film).
  • A very long sequence in which Bonnie and Clyde get drunk and come to terms with their impending death. They trash their room and rip out the mattress from their bed, turning it into a makeshift coffin. They then put on their best clothes and put makeup on each other so they can see what they will look like when they're dead. The scene concludes with Bonnie and Clyde dancing around CW by candlelight and chanting "The Hearse Song."
  • During the Platte City raid, C.W. uses a machine gun to attack the armored car instead of grenades.
  • The final shootout, in it's earliest form, was done entirely with still photos shown over sounds of machine gun fire and screams, and we never actually saw Bonnie or Clyde dead. The movie ended with the two farmers running towards the car while "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" Played in the background.


Soundtracks

Shadow Waltz
(uncredited)
Music by
Harry Warren
Played on the radio during the gas mask scene

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Action | Biography | Crime | Drama

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