Playtime (1967)

Not Rated   |    |  Comedy


Playtime (1967) Poster

Monsieur Hulot curiously wanders around a high-tech Paris, paralleling a trip with a group of American tourists. Meanwhile, a nightclub/restaurant prepares its opening night, but it's still under construction.


7.9/10
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  • Jacques Tati in Playtime (1967)
  • Jacques Tati in Playtime (1967)
  • Jacques Tati in Playtime (1967)
  • Jacques Tati in Playtime (1967)
  • Jacques Tati and Barbara Dennek in Playtime (1967)
  • Jacques Tati in Playtime (1967)

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


12 October 2001 | leahbrooks
A fantastic film, has stayed in my memory for years and years
I have only seen Playtime once--in 1975 when I was a teenager living in Los Angeles. I, too, saw it at an art revival movie house (though probably not in 70mm) and remember it to this day! I recall the feeling of having entered a maze, or being lost and dazzled, of thinking how life was like a labrynth and how funny and touching Tati was. I still recommend it to people, especially if you like Fellini. Also, I think the film "After Hours" was based on this film, but the original is far more magical.

Critic Reviews



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Did You Know?

Trivia

Though M. Hulot's part within 'PlayTime' is somewhat diminished, Jacques Tati does appear in the background as four other (very minor) characters across the film. Firstly, he portrays a policeman who is directing traffic (just prior to Barbara's attempts to photograph the florist), the central workman installing a window (just prior to Hulot finally catching up with Giffard), a workman scratching his back at the Royal Garden (just as the restaurant's first guests arrive), and as a different workman on stage (complaining to the orchestra whilst holding electrical cables).


Quotes

Barbara, Young Tourist: How do you say "drugstore" in French?
Monsieur Hulot: Drugstore.


Goofs

In the store Hulot takes the elevator up several floors, but he is then seen looking down from the 2nd to 1st floor, with traffic visible at street level.


Crazy Credits

The title isn't shown until the end of the opening credits. Additionally, there are no end credits. The final shot simply fades out and there is about a minute of exit music.


Alternate Versions

First assembled cut ran 155 min. with intermission and exit music. This version was edited down by Tati himself to 124 minutes as a shorter film seemed more lucrative (Tati was in financial trouble because of the non-successful run of Mon Oncle (1958) and the long shooting of _Play Time (1967)_). It was released on 70 mm with 6-Track sound. In the US the film was released with a running time of 93 min. and 1-Track mono sound. Other versions ran between 108-120 min. and were released on 35 mm with 4-Track Stereo sound (quadraphonic). Over the years the 124 min. version became unavailable as the shorter versions were shown in wider circulation. In 2001 the film was restored and shown in its original 124 min. cut at Cannes Film Festival 2002.

Storyline

Plot Summary


Genres

Comedy

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