2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

G   |    |  Adventure, Sci-Fi


2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) Poster

After discovering a mysterious artifact buried beneath the Lunar surface, mankind sets off on a quest to find its origins with help from intelligent supercomputer H.A.L. 9000.


8.3/10
613,671

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Reviews & Commentary

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User Reviews


20 April 2003 | drn5
10
| My god, it's full of stars
For all those bewildered by the length and pace of this film ("like, why does he show spaceships docking for, like, 15 minutes?"), here's a word you might want to think about:

Beauty.

Beauty is an under-rated concept. Sure, you'll often see nice photography and so on in films. But when did you last see a film that contains beauty purely for the sake of it? There is a weird belief among cinemagoers that anything which is not plot or character related must be removed. This is depressing hogwash. There is nothing wrong with creating a beautiful sequence that has nothing to do with the film's plot. A director can show 15 minutes of spaceships for no reason than that they are beautiful, and it is neither illegal nor evil to do so.

'2001' requires you to watch in a different way than you normally watch films. It requires you to relax. It requires you to experience strange and beautiful images without feeling guilty that there is no complex plot or detailed characterization. Don't get me wrong, plots and characters are good, but they're not the be-all and end-all of everything. There are different KINDS of film, and to enjoy '2001' you must tune your brain to a different wavelength and succumb to the pleasure of beauty, PURE beauty, unfettered by the banal conventions of everyday films.

"All art is quite useless" - Oscar Wilde.

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Did You Know?

Trivia

To create the facial make-up for the australopithecines, technicians first made a plastic skull substructure with a hinged jaw. After making molds of the actors' faces, the make-up men applied rubber skin to their faces and added hair one strand at a time, as if they were making a wig. Lip movements were achieved by using false teeth and tongues to hide the actors' real mouths. This freed the actors to use their tongues to operate remote controls that moved the lips. Only the actors' eyes were visible, and the masks were made up right to the eye-lids.


Quotes

Aries-1B stewardess: Here you are, sir, main level please.


Goofs

The moon-monolith remains in place for 4 million years, but the ape-men monolith disappears the very next day. However, no detailed information about the nature of the monoliths is given and there's no reason to believe they all act identically. At a minimum, it seems the first monolith was there to program the ape-men and the moon monolith was an alarm.


Crazy Credits

In the 2001 UK cinema re-release, the music carries on for 10-15 minutes after the end of the credits.


Alternate Versions

The original theatrical release had György Ligeti's "Atmospheres" set to a black screen for roughly 8 to 10 minutes before the movie began, and Johann Strauss's "The Blue Danube" long after the end credits set to a black screen. This overture and exit music survived the premiere edits mentioned above. For a long while, revivals and all television and cable broadcasts would cut both, starting directly at the beginning of the credits and ending immediately after the end credits, but current revivals in such places as the Film Forum in New York City and cable channels such as the Sundance Channel, Bravo, the Independent Channel, and PBS have been restoring the pre- and post-movie music.


Soundtracks

The Blue Danube
(1866)
("An der schönen, blauen Donau, op. 314 (The Blue Danube)")
Music by
Johann Strauss (as Johann Strauss)
Performed by Berliner Philharmoniker (as the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra)
Conductor Herbert von Karajan
Courtesy Deutsche Grammophon

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Adventure | Sci-Fi

Details

Release Date:

24 June 1970

Language

English, Russian


Country of Origin

UK, USA

Filming Locations

Spitzkoppe, Erongo, Namibia

Box Office

Budget:

$12,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$202,759 20 May 2018

Gross USA:

$60,405,931

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$65,783,882

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