2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

G   |    |  Adventure, Sci-Fi


2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) Poster

After discovering a mysterious artifact buried beneath the lunar surface, mankind sets off on a quest to find its origins with help from intelligent supercomputer HAL 9000.

TIP
Add this title to your Watchlist
Save movies and shows to keep track of what you want to watch.

8.3/10
534,003

Videos


Photos

  • Keir Dullea and Gary Lockwood in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • Keir Dullea in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  • Stanley Kubrick and Gary Lockwood in 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

See all photos

More of What You Love

Find what you're looking for even quicker with the IMDb app on your smartphone or tablet.

Get the IMDb app

Director's Trademarks: A Guide to Stanley Kubrick's Films

2001: A Space Odyssey and Eyes Wide Shut are just the beginning of Stanley Kubrick's legacy. Are you up to speed on the film icon's style?

Watch the video

Reviews & Commentary

Add a Review


User Reviews


17 June 2003 | simon_booth
10
| Unmatched accomplishment
Sometimes reading the user comments on IMDB fills me with despair for the species. For anybody to dismiss 2001: A Space Odyssey as "boring" they must have no interest in science, technology, philosophy, history or the art of film-making. Finally I understand why most Hollywood productions are so shallow and vacuous - they understand their audience.

Thankfully, those that cannot appreciate Kubrick's accomplishment are still a minority. Most viewers are able to see the intelligence and sheer virtuosity that went into the making of this epic. This is the film that put the science in "science fiction", and its depiction of space travel and mankind's future remains unsurpassed to this day. It was so far ahead of its time that humanity still hasn't caught up.

2001 is primarily a technical film. The reason it is slow, and filled with minutae is because the aim was to realistically envision the future of technology (and the past, in the awe inspiring opening scenes). The film's greatest strength is in the details. Remember that when this film was made, man still hadn't made it out to the moon... but there it is in 2001, and that's just the start of the journey. To create such an incredibly detailed vision of the future that 35 years later it is still the best we have is beyond belief - I still can't work out how some of the shots were done. The film's only notable mistake was the optimism with which it predicted mankind's technological (and social) development. It is our shame that the year 2001 did not look like the film 2001, not Kubrick's.

Besides the incredible special effects, camera work and set design, Kubrick also presents the viewer with a lot of food for thought about what it means to be human, and where the human race is going. Yes, the ending is weird and hard to comprehend - but that's the nature of the future. Kubrick and Clarke have started the task of envisioning it, now it's up to the audience to continue. There's no neat resolution, no definitive full stop, because then the audience could stop thinking after the final reel. I know that's what most audiences seem to want these days, but Kubrick isn't going to let us off so lightly.

I'm glad to see that this film is in the IMDB top 100 films, and only wish that it were even higher. Stanley Kubrick is one of the very finest film-makers the world has known, and 2001 his finest accomplishment. 10/10.

Metacritic Reviews


Critic Reviews



More Like This

  • Full Metal Jacket

    Full Metal Jacket

  • A Clockwork Orange

    A Clockwork Orange

  • The Shining

    The Shining

  • Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

    Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

  • Blade Runner

    Blade Runner

  • Alien

    Alien

  • Psycho

    Psycho

  • Taxi Driver

    Taxi Driver

  • Reservoir Dogs

    Reservoir Dogs

  • Apocalypse Now

    Apocalypse Now

  • Citizen Kane

    Citizen Kane

  • Scarface

    Scarface

Did You Know?

Trivia

According to Stanley Kubrick biographer John Baxter, Kubrick decided to use the Sinar Front Projection system for the desert backdrops during the Dawn of Man scenes. This method was selected because rear projection of the desert scenes would have proved too murky for Super Panavision. The use of the Sinar system explains why in the scene where the leopard is sitting next to the dead zebra (in reality a painted dead horse) the leopard's eyes glow a bright color. The Sinar system used glass transparencies as backdrops; however, the projectors necessary for this system were so hot that a draft or a breath could crack the glass. As a result, crew members were required to wear face masks, which started a long-persistent rumor that Kubrick had a paranoia of catching infections.


Quotes

Aries-1B stewardess: Here you are, sir, main level please.


Goofs

In the BBC interview, Dave says that in hibernation the heart only beats once a minute. However when the life signs graphs of the astronauts in hibernation are shown, its a regular heartbeat that's occurring, not a heart beating at once a minute.


Crazy Credits

The original theatrical release had Ligeti's Atmospheres to a black screen for roughly 8 to 10 minutes before the movie began, and Strauss' The Blue Danube well after the end credits to a black screen.


Alternate Versions

Most current video versions contain the 139-minute general release version plus the original overture, entr'acte, and exit music from the roadshow version.


Soundtracks

Happy Birthday to You
(1893) (uncredited)
Written by
Mildred J. Hill and Patty S. Hill
Performed by Alan Gifford and Ann Gillis

Storyline

Plot Summary


Synopsis (WARNING: Spoilers)


Genres

Adventure | Sci-Fi

How Ricky Whittle Brings Shadow Moon to Life

Ricky Whittle, the star at the center of "American Gods," credits amazing co-stars and killer special effects for his mind-bending performance.

Watch now

Featured on IMDb

Check out our guide to the SXSW 2019, what to watch on TV, and a look back at the 2018-2019 awards season.

Around The Web

 | 

Powered by ZergNet

More To Explore

Search on Amazon.com